STP1218

    A Comparative Analysis of the Toxicity of Boron Compounds to Freshwater and Saltwater Species

    Published: Jan 1995


      Format Pages Price  
    PDF (420K) 15 $25   ADD TO CART
    Complete Source PDF (7.4M) 15 $98   ADD TO CART


    Abstract

    Inorganic borates and boric acid (boron-oxygen compounds) enter the environment as contaminants from the manufacture and industrial and household use of boron-containing compounds; from borax mining; and from coal, oil, and geothermal power generation. In general, boron compounds are more toxic to freshwater invertebrates than to freshwater fishes, with 48-hr LC50 values ranging from <52–226 mg B/L in the water flea (Daphnia magna) and 96-hr LC50 values ranging from 332–979 mg B/L in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis). Data also indicate that boron compounds are more toxic to saltwater crustaceans and fish than to freshwater species, with a 24-hr LC50 of 28.35 mg B/L in the saltwater isopod (Limnoria lignorum) and a 96-hr LC50 of 74 mg B/L in dab (Limanda limanda). A comparison of the acute toxicity of boron-oxygen compounds to adult and early developmental stages of fishes and invertebrates indicates that most species are more sensitive to sodium borates (sodium perborate > borax) than to boric acid. This increased toxicity may be attributed to a pH shift into the alkaline range, which in fish results in increased mucus formation and crippling behavior.

    Keywords:

    Sodium borate, Boric acid, Aquatic toxicity, Water quality criteria, Freshwater fish, amphibians, invertebrates, Saltwater fish and invertebrates


    Author Information:

    Hovatter, PS
    Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Ross, RH
    Group Leader, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee


    Paper ID: STP12696S

    Committee/Subcommittee: E47.10

    DOI: 10.1520/STP12696S


    CrossRef ASTM International is a member of CrossRef.