Standard Historical Last Updated: Aug 16, 2017
ASTM D3730-98

Standard Guide for Testing High-Performance Interior Architectural Wall Coatings

Scope

1.1 This guide covers the selection and use of test methods for high-performance interior architectural wall coatings (HIPAC) which differ from more conventional coatings in that they are tougher, more stain-resistant, more abrasion-resistant and, ordinarily, designed to be applied to wall surfaces of steel, masonry (poured concrete, concrete block, or cinder block), and plaster or gypsum wallboard. The tests that are listed in Tables 1 and 2 are designed to measure performance properties. These tests may not all be required for each HIPAC system. Selection of the test methods to be followed must be governed by experience and the requirements in each individual case, together with agreement between the purchaser and the seller.

1.2 High-performance architectural coatings are tough, extra-durable organic coating systems that are applied as a continuous (seamless) film and cure to a hard finish. The finish can be high gloss, semigloss, or low gloss as desired. These coatings are resistant to persistent heat, humidity, abrasion, staining, chemicals, and fungus growth. They are used in areas where humidity, wear, or unusual chemical resistance requirements, particularly to soiling, are required and where strong detergents are used to maintain sanitary conditions. Halls and stairways in public buildings, lavatories, stall showers, locker areas, animal pens, and biological laboratories are typical applications. In addition, food processing plants, dairies, restaurants, schools, and transport terminals frequently use HIPAC systems. These are effective in many areas of building interiors compared with tile and are of low materials and maintenance costs. HIPAC systems should be used as a complete system only as recommended by the manufacturer since the individual coats in a system are formulated to be compatible with each other. HIPAC systems should be applied only to properly prepared surfaces such as steel and masonry that include cinder blocks and cement blocks. They can be applied over plaster and gypsum wallboard. Ordinarily, a prime or fill coat, if required, is part of the system.

1.3 While they are excellent for walls, HIPAC are not usually intended for ceilings and floors. They would not ordinarily be used in homes, although parents with small children might want to use HIPAC coatings on some walls.

1.4 The types of resin ordinarily used are the following: epoxy-polyamide, two-package; polyester-epoxy, two-package; polyurethane, one-package or two-package. However, other resin types are not excluded provided they can meet the requirements (performance specifications) laid down by the purchaser.

1.5 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as the standard. The SI units given in parentheses are for information only.

1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For a specific hazard statement, see the Note in 7.5.

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Details
Book of Standards Volume: 06.02
Developed by Subcommittee: D01.42
Pages: 9
DOI: 10.1520/D3730-98
ICS Code: 87.040