The Resilience in Construction Series: Windborne Debris Standards in Hurricanes for Exterior Windows, Curtain Walls, Doors, and Impact Protective Systems Webinar

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    About the Course

    Join us on May 6, 2020 from 2:00 to 3:00 pm ET for this webinar.

    E1886, Standard Test Method for Performance of Exterior Windows, Curtain Walls, Doors, and Impact Protective Systems Impacted by Missile(s) and Exposed to Cyclic Pressure Differentials

    and

    E1996, Standard Specification for Performance of Exterior Windows, Curtain Walls, Doors, and Impact Protective Systems Impacted by Windborne Debris in Hurricanes

    Recognition of the impact of windborne debris on building performance in hurricanes began with Cyclone Tracy, 1974, in Darwin Australia and was recognized in Hurricane Alicia, 1983, in Houston. Supported by research by Professor Joe Minor at Texas Tech, efforts to develop a regulatory approach were initiated at SBCCI. Initially a controversial effort, ASTM Committee E06 was able to develop two standards, a standard test method (E1866) and a standard specification (E1996) in time for inclusion as references in the first edition of the International Building Code (IBC) in 2000. The two standards have been updated periodically ever since. The webinar will describe this history of developments and benefits of E1886 and E1996.


    Who Should Attend

    This webinar is designed for members of ASTM Committees E06, C14, Property Casualty professionals, bankers, Emergency disaster professionals, Code officials, and other technical experts.


    About the Instructor

    David B.Hattis

    Mr. Hattis is one of the founders, in 1972, and is the current President of Building Technology Inc. His work at BTI includes projects related to the building regulatory system; performance analysis of buildings, both new and existing; the economic and financial implications of decisions related to building performance on a life-cycle basis; and the study and use of historic properties. Mr. Hattis has authored numerous reports and delivered technical papers on these subjects. He is a recognized expert in the field of building performance and regulation.

    He received an AB degree in economics and psychology from Swarthmore College and a M.Arch degree in architecture from the Harvard Graduate School of Design.