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    Volume 49, Issue 6 (April 2021)

    Termite Testing Methods: A Global Review

    (Received 20 July 2020; accepted 8 January 2021)

    Published Online: 23 April 2021

    CODEN: JTEVAB

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    Abstract

    The protection of wood against termites is a major global problem, especially in the tropics and subtropics, and has been the subject of considerable research to understand termite biology and to develop effective mitigation methods. Field trials are useful for this purpose, but they often lack the degree of control and reproducibility needed. As a result, many researchers use laboratory methods when evaluating new wood preservatives or the suitability of timber for specific uses. These methods have developed over many years and in many regions with differing termite species and risks. Some methods differ only slightly from one another, but others use dramatically different approaches based upon the behavior and biology of a given termite species. The range of methods can make it difficult to make comparisons in terms of termite behavior, timber species preferences, or treatment efficacy. This review assembles the methods used for evaluating termite attack, explaining the underlying termite biology connected with each method, and identifying commonalities that might facilitate comparisons between various data sets, or potentially standardizing the standards. Understanding the essential characteristics of test methodologies can help identify the most appropriate methods for assessing the effectiveness of a given treatment, but it may also help compare results from different approaches, thereby avoiding redundant tests.

    Author Information:

    Hassan, Babar
    National Centre for Timber Durability and Design Life, University of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland,

    Morrell, Jeffrey J.
    National Centre for Timber Durability and Design Life, University of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland,


    Stock #: JTE20200455

    ISSN:0090-3973

    DOI: 10.1520/JTE20200455

    Author
    Title Termite Testing Methods: A Global Review
    Symposium ,
    Committee D07