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    Volume 46, Issue 3 (November 2017)

    Comparison of Cultivation Methods Impact on Playability of Agrostis stolonifera Greens

    (Received 13 August 2016; accepted 13 January 2017)

    Published Online: 10 November 2017

    CODEN: JTEVAB

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    Abstract

    Creeping bentrgrass putting greens require intense management due to stoloniferous growth (thatch accumulation) and excessive wear and traffic by equipment and golfers. Increases in thatch and soil compaction are often managed with cultivation practices, which lead to downtime for golfers. Field research was conducted in Knoxville, TN, and Elizabethtown, KY, to compare new and traditional cultivation methods for their impact on playability on creeping bentgrass putting greens. Treatments included air injection, dry sand injection, solid tine cultivation topdressed with sand, hollow tine cultivation topdressed with sand, and non-treated control. Treatments were arranged in a randomized complete block design replicated three times at two locations. As determined 15 minutes after treatments, air injection resulted in the least reduction of green turfgrass cover, no ball roll reduction from the control, and lower reductions in surface firmness compared to other methods tested. Hollow tine had the greatest reduction in green turfgrass cover, lowest ball roll distance, and greatest reductions in surface firmness. Air injection had a lower impact on surface characteristics than hollow or solid cultivation. Because turf cover, ball roll, and firmness can all affect putting green playability, these findings indicate that air injection cultivation has the smallest impact on golfers immediately after a cultivation event.

    Author Information:

    Dickson, K.
    Dept. of Plant Sciences, The Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

    Sorochan, J.
    Dept. of Plant Sciences, The Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

    Munshaw, G.
    University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

    Thoms, A.
    Iowa State University, Ames, IA


    Stock #: JTE20160419

    ISSN:0090-3973

    DOI: 10.1520/JTE20160419

    Author
    Title Comparison of Cultivation Methods Impact on Playability of Agrostis stolonifera Greens
    Symposium ,
    Committee F08