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    Volume 45, Issue 6 (November 2017)

    Special Issue Paper

    Ultra-High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Concrete: Shrinkage Strain Development at Early Ages and Potential for Cracking

    (Received 29 February 2016; accepted 21 September 2016)

    Published Online: 2017

    CODEN: JTEVAB

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    Abstract

    This study investigates the effects of the concrete-ring thickness and steel fiber on the restrained shrinkage behavior of ultra-high-performance fiber-reinforced concrete (UHPFRC) using the ring test. To do this, three different concrete-ring thicknesses (tc = 20, 30, and 40 mm) and two different fiber contents (Vf = 0 % and 2 %) were considered. The test results indicated that the ring specimen without fiber exhibited shrinkage cracking after nearly 1.4 days because of its low tensile strength, whereas no shrinkage cracking was observed for the ring specimens with fibers during testing. A thicker concrete ring provided lower residual stress, relaxed stress, degree of restraint, and cracking potential. Therefore, it was concluded that using steel fiber and increasing the concrete thickness perpendicular to the tensile stress direction can improve the shrinkage cracking resistance of UHPFRC.

    Author Information:

    Yoo, D.-Y.
    Dept. of Architectural Engineering, Hanyang Univ., Seoul,

    Banthia, N.
    Dept. of Civil Engineering, The Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver,

    Yoon, Y.-S.
    School of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, Korea Univ., Seoul,


    Stock #: JTE20160114

    ISSN:0090-3973

    DOI: 10.1520/JTE20160114

    Author
    Title Ultra-High-Performance Fiber-Reinforced Concrete: Shrinkage Strain Development at Early Ages and Potential for Cracking
    Symposium ,
    Committee C09