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    Volume 43, Issue 4 (July 2015)

    Field and Laboratory Evaluation of Environmental Effects on Chip Seal Performance: Freeze-Thaw and Asphalt Aging

    (Received 17 June 2013; accepted 25 March 2014)

    Published Online: 14 July 2015

    CODEN: JTEVAB

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    Abstract

    Chip seals generally deteriorate as a result of asphalt oxidation, wear and polishing of aggregates, bleeding, and raveling (loss of aggregates). In this study, two major environmental effects on chip seal performance, freeze-thaw, and asphalt aging were investigated based on laboratory tests and field distress survey. For freeze-thaw evaluation, laboratory chip seal samples were prepared for 18 combinations (6 aggregates X 3 asphaltic materials). A simple freeze-thaw protocol was developed and evaluation of freeze-thaw effect on aggregate types reveals that both the precoated and uncoated expanded shale lightweight aggregates perform comparatively very well against freeze-thaw. Evaluation of freeze-thaw effect on asphaltic material types reveals that CRS-2P, an emulsion performs significantly better than hot asphalts, namely PAC-15 and AC20-5TR. For aging evaluation, asphaltic materials were extracted from 15 (5 aggregates X 3 asphaltic materials) field test sections and increase in stiffness due to aging were determined using a dynamic shear rheometer. For each of the five aggregates, CRS-2P shows the lowest G*/sinδ, indicating minimum field aging susceptibility among the three asphaltic materials while AC20-5TR shows slightly higher G*/sinδ than PAC-15, indicating maximum field aging susceptibility. Overall field distress ratings of the CRS-2P sections (sum of distress ratings of all the CRS-2P sections) are better than those of PAC-15 and AC20-5TR. The overall distress ratings of PAC-15 sections are better than overall distress ratings of AC20-5TR. In case of aggregate types, precoated expanded shale lightweight test sections performed the best, while expanded clay lightweight sections performed very poorly. Both freeze-thaw and asphalt aging tests closely reflect field performances and it can be concluded that the freeze-thaw and aging performances can be used as effective tools for predicting long term chip seal performances.


    Author Information:

    Wasiuddin, Nazimuddin M.
    Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston, LA

    Wilson, Kisler
    Graduate Student, Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston, LA

    Islam, Mohammad Readul
    Graduate Student, Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston, LA

    Parker, Phillip
    P. R. Parker Company, Inc., Shreveport, LA

    Abadie, Christopher
    Materials Engineer Administrator, Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development, Baton Rouge, LA

    Mohammad, Louay N.
    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Holder of the Irma Louise Rush Stewart Distinguished Professorship, Director, Engineering Materials Characterization Research Facility, Louisiana Transportation Research Center, Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA


    Stock #: JTE20130151

    ISSN:0090-3973

    DOI: 10.1520/JTE20130151

    Author
    Title Field and Laboratory Evaluation of Environmental Effects on Chip Seal Performance: Freeze-Thaw and Asphalt Aging
    Symposium ,
    Committee D04