You are being redirected because this document is part of your ASTM Compass® subscription.
    This document is part of your ASTM Compass® subscription.

    If you are an ASTM Compass Subscriber and this document is part of your subscription, you can access it for free at ASTM Compass
    Volume 7, Issue 5 (October 2018)

    Special Issue Paper

    Cavitation Erosion Performance of Steel, Ceramics, Carbide, and Victrex PEEK Materials

    (Received 6 February 2018; accepted 27 August 2018)

    Published Online: 19 October 2018

    CODEN: MPCACD

      Format Pages Price  
    PDF (1.59 MB) 14 $25   ADD TO CART

    Cite this document

    X Add email address send
    X
      .RIS For RefWorks, EndNote, ProCite, Reference Manager, Zoteo, and many others.   .DOCX For Microsoft Word



    Abstract

    Cavitation erosion has to be taken into consideration during material selection in many industrial sectors, e.g., offshore, marine, and oil and gas, in which components operate under severe working conditions. The cavitation erosion equipment, located at the University of Southampton, uses a vibratory apparatus to compare, rank, and characterize the cavitation erosion performance of materials. This article highlights some of the results obtained from industrial research (consultancy) work employing a Hielscher UIP1000hd 20 kHz ultrasonic transducer (Hielscher Ultrasonics GmbH, Teltow, Germany). The transducer is attached to a titanium horn to induce the formation and collapse of cavities in a liquid, creating erosion (material loss) of the specimen undergoing testing. The results from erosion cavitation testing (in accordance with ASTM G32-16, Standard Test Method for Cavitation Erosion Using Vibratory Apparatus (Superseded)) of two commercially available steels are presented herein and are shown to have less resistance to cavitation when compared to polyether(ether ketone), ceramic, and carbide materials. These materials are presented, along with Nickel 200, which was used to normalize the results. A plot of cumulative erosion versus exposure time was determined by periodic interruption of the test.

    Author Information:

    Court, Spencer
    nC2 Consulting, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton,

    Corni, Ilaria
    nC2 Consulting, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton,

    Symonds, Nicola
    nC2 Consulting, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton,


    Stock #: MPC20180027

    ISSN:2379-1365

    DOI: 10.1520/MPC20180027

    Author
    Title Cavitation Erosion Performance of Steel, Ceramics, Carbide, and Victrex PEEK Materials
    Symposium ,
    Committee G02