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    Volume 4, Issue 1

    Superelastic Ball Bearings: Materials and Design to Avoid Mounting and Dismounting Brinell Damage in an Inaccessible Press-Fit Application. Part II: Detailed Analysis

    (Received 26 May 2015; accepted 24 July 2015)

    CODEN: MPCACD

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    Abstract

    Rolling element bearings utilized in precision rotating machines require proper alignment, preload, and interference fits to ensure overall optimum performance. Hence, careful attention must be given to bearing installation and machine assembly procedures to ensure the above conditions are met. Usually, machines are designed such that bearings can be pressed into housings or onto shafts through the races without loading the rolling elements. However, in some instances, either because of limited size or access, a bearing must be installed or removed in such a way that the load path travels through the rolling elements. This can cause high-contact stresses between the rolling elements and the races and introduces the potential for Brinell denting of the races. In this paper, an in-depth treatment is given to the design of a dent-resistant bearing utilizing a superelastic alloy, 60NiTi, for the races. A companion paper by the authors (Part I [1]) discusses material selection and the general design philosophy for the bearing. Here, a common bearing analysis tool based on rigid body dynamics is used to design the bearing in combination with finite-element simulations to further understand the limitations of the design. The primary design constraints are prevention of denting and avoiding the balls riding over the edge of the race groove during a blind disassembly process where the load passes through the rolling elements. Through an iterative process, the resulting bearing geometry is tailored to improve axial static load capability compared to a deep-groove ball bearing of the same size. The results suggest that careful selection of materials and bearing geometry can enable blind disassembly without damage to the raceways, which is necessary in the current application (a compressor in the International Space Station distillation assembly), and results in design flexibility for other applications, especially small machines with miniature bearings.


    Author Information:

    Howard, Samuel A.
    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, John H. Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH

    DellaCorte, Christopher
    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, John H. Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH

    Carney, Kelly S.
    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, John H. Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH


    Stock #: MPC20150028

    ISSN:2165-3992

    DOI: 10.1520/MPC20150028

    Author
    Title Superelastic Ball Bearings: Materials and Design to Avoid Mounting and Dismounting Brinell Damage in an Inaccessible Press-Fit Application. Part II: Detailed Analysis
    Symposium ,
    Committee F34