ASTM G13 / G13M - 13

    Standard Test Method for Impact Resistance of Pipeline Coatings (Limestone Drop Test)

    Active Standard ASTM G13 / G13M | Developed by Subcommittee: D01.48

    Book of Standards Volume: 06.02


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    Significance and Use

    4.1 This test method is intended to simulate the effects of backfilling after pipe has been placed in the trench. The backfill is often rocky soil and, if it is unscreened and the coated pipe is unshielded by sand or other protective padding, the falling rocks may seriously damage the coating.

    1. Scope

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the relative resistance of pipeline coatings to impact by observing the effects of falling stones on coated pipe specimens.

    1.2 The values stated in either SI units or inch-pound units are to be regarded separately as standard. The values stated in each system may not be exact equivalents; therefore, each system shall be used independently of the other. Combining values from the two systems may result in non-conformance with the standard.

    1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.


    2. Referenced Documents (purchase separately) The documents listed below are referenced within the subject standard but are not provided as part of the standard.

    ASTM Standards

    G12 Test Method for Nondestructive Measurement of Film Thickness of Pipeline Coatings on Steel

    G62 Test Methods for Holiday Detection in Pipeline Coatings


    ICS Code

    ICS Number Code 87.040 (Paints and varnishes)

    UNSPSC Code

    UNSPSC Code


    DOI: 10.1520/G0013_G0013M

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