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    ASTM F1591 - 95(2012)

    Standard Practice for Visual Signals Between Persons on the Ground and in Aircraft During Ground Emergencies

    Active Standard ASTM F1591 | Developed by Subcommittee: F32.02

    Book of Standards Volume: 13.02


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    Significance and Use

    While many of the reasons for needing the signals contained in this practice have been overcome by technology development, situations still arise where voice communications cannot be established between aircraft and persons on the ground during emergencies. This is particularly true of persons in distress, who typically have no communications equipment. These signals continue to meet the need for communications.

    Most of these signals have been adopted by international convention, the others by civilian and military agencies of the United States Government. The signals described in this practice are intended for use on land and can be made without special equipment such as flares or colored panels. Other signaling systems are described in the National Search and Rescue (SAR) Manual.

    The signals are also useful in situations where either complete or partial voice communications exist. Where only partial capabilities exist, for example, a ground unit with receive-only capability, the aircrew can transmit voice and the ground crew can respond with the appropriate signal.

    The signals described in Section 4, by their nature, are not intended for real-time communications with aircraft. They can be left unattended as messages for aircrews. Persons on the ground (SAR or otherwise) can make a signal and continue on without contact with the aircraft. The SAR personnel should keep this in mind when encountering the signals of Fig. 1.

    Search and rescue agencies utilizing this practice should disseminate these signals to the public as part of their preventative search and rescue (PSAR) efforts. The signals have changed over the years and a number of publications contain obsolete signals.


    FIG. 1 Ground-to-Air Signals

    1. Scope

    1.1 This practice covers the signals to be used between persons on the ground and in aircraft when two-way voice communications cannot be established during ground emergencies. Ground signals are limited to land-based ones that do not require special equipment. Flare, light, panel, and maritime signals are specifically excluded.

    1.2 The signals are divided into two categories: those used by persons on the ground and those used by aircraft.

    1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.


    2. Referenced Documents (purchase separately) The documents listed below are referenced within the subject standard but are not provided as part of the standard.

    International Civil Aviation Organization Standard

    International Standards and Recommended Practices, Search and Rescue, Annex 12 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation Available from the International Civil Aviation Organization; Document Sales Unit; 1000 Sherbrooke St. West, Suite 400; Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 2R2.


    ICS Code

    ICS Number Code 03.220.50 (Air transport)

    UNSPSC Code

    UNSPSC Code 25201900(Aircraft emergency systems)


    Referencing This Standard

    DOI: 10.1520/F1591-95R12

    ASTM International is a member of CrossRef.

    Citation Format

    ASTM F1591-95(2012), Standard Practice for Visual Signals Between Persons on the Ground and in Aircraft During Ground Emergencies, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA, 2012, www.astm.org

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