ASTM D6661 - 10

    Standard Practice for Field Collection of Organic Compounds from Surfaces Using Wipe Sampling

    Active Standard ASTM D6661 | Developed by Subcommittee: D34.01.02

    Book of Standards Volume: 11.04


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    Significance and Use

    Wipe sampling is typically used by persons involved in hazardous waste site investigations to characterize the areal extent and the level of contamination on walls, floors, equipment, etc. Wipe sampling is also used to determine compliance with regulations.

    There are many factors that contribute to variation in sampling results during wipe sampling including, the use of different pressures applied to the wipe, different kinds of wipes, different wiping patterns, the texture of the surface being wiped, and perhaps even the duration of wiping. The significance of this practice is that it standardizes wiping procedures to reduce sampling variability in the collection of samples from smooth, nonporous surfaces such as metal, glass, painted or sealed surfaces, tile, etc., in and around buildings, and from pipes, tanks, decontaminated equipment, etc.

    1. Scope

    1.1 This practice addresses sampling of organic compounds (i.e., PCBs, dioxins, many pesticides and similar compounds) from smooth nonporous surfaces using a solvent-wetted wipe sampling method. Samples are collected in a manner that permits the solvent extraction of the organic compound(s) of interest from the wipes and subsequent determination using a laboratory analysis technique such as gas chromatography with a suitable detector. This practice is, however, unsuitable for the collection of volatile organic compounds.

    1.2 This practice should only be used to collect samples for the determination of organic compound(s) on a loading basis (e.g., mass per unit area). It cannot be used to collect samples for the determination of organic compounds on a concentration basis (e.g., mass per unit mass).

    1.3 This wipe sampling practice is not recommended for collecting samples of organic compounds from rough or porous surfaces such as upholstery, carpeting, brick, rough concrete, ceiling tiles, and bare wood. It is also not intended for the collection of dust samples (see Practice E1278) or sampling to estimating human exposure to contaminated surfaces.

    1.4 To ensure valid conclusions are reached, a sufficient number of samples must be obtained as directed by a sampling design (the number and location of samples including quality control samples) and a quality assurance/quality control plan. This practice does not address the sampling designs used to achieve the data quality objectives (see Practice D5792).

    1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard.

    1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.


    2. Referenced Documents (purchase separately) The documents listed below are referenced within the subject standard but are not provided as part of the standard.

    ASTM Standards

    D4687 Guide for General Planning of Waste Sampling

    D5681 Terminology for Waste and Waste Management

    D5792 Practice for Generation of Environmental Data Related to Waste Management Activities: Development of Data Quality Objectives

    E1278 Guide for Radioactive Pathway Methodology for Release of Sites Following Decommissioning


    ICS Code

    ICS Number Code 13.020.40 (Pollution, pollution control and conservation); 19.020 (Test conditions and procedures in general)

    UNSPSC Code

    UNSPSC Code 77101900(Pollution investigation services)


    DOI: 10.1520/D6661-10

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