ASTM D4763 - 06(2012)

    Standard Practice for Identification of Chemicals in Water by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Active Standard ASTM D4763 | Developed by Subcommittee: D19.06

    Book of Standards Volume: 11.02


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    Significance and Use

    This practice is useful for detecting and identifying (or determining the absence of) 90 chemicals with relatively high fluorescence yields (see Table 1). Most commonly, this practice will be useful for distinguishing single fluorescent chemicals in solution, simple mixtures or single fluorescing chemicals in the presence of other nonfluorescing chemicals. Chemicals with high fluorescence yields tend to have aromatic rings, some heterocyclic rings or extended conjugated double-bond systems. Typical chemicals included on this list include aromatics, substituted aromatics such as phenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's), some pesticides such as DDT, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's), some heterocyclics, and some esters, organic acids, and ketones.

    TABLE 1 Summary of Experimental Parameters and Results

    ChemicalCodeConcentra-
    tions, ppm
    Solventλexc, nm, nmNumber
    of Peaks
    WHM,
    nm
    Shoulder
    Number
    Detection
    Limit
    (DL), ppm
    λ DL, nmComments
    AcenaphtheneACN1.03CH290323 4... 30.001290
    Acetone ACT227CH2904101... ...212290
    AcridineACR96CH285/355386/4224/2...2/0......
    ACR9.6ETOH290/355357/415 2/2...1/10.02/0.04290/355
    Aniline ANL15.5CH2803161... ...0.037280
    AnthraceneATH1.03CH355378 4... 10.001355
    ATH1.55ETOH3553804... 10.001355
    Aroclor 1242
    1254
    PC4
    PC5
    131
    129
    CH
    CH
    270
    270
    317
    317
    2
    2
    35
    36
    1
    1
    0.3
    2
    270
    270
    AtrazineATZ369CH290350 1... ...300290
    AzinphosmethylAZP112CH350410 260 ...10350
    AZP122ETOH340420280 ...4 340
    Benz(a)anthraceneBAT1.1CH280386 4... 10.003280
    Benzene BNZ79CH250279324 12/4 250/265
    BenzonitrileBZN9.9CH260287 228 10.1/0.1260/270
    Benzo(a)pyreneBAP0.088CH370405 6... 20.002370
    Benzyl alcoholBAL99CH250284 227 10.1/0.1250/260
    Benzyl amineBZM118CH250283 127 23/2 250/260
    Benzyl triethylam-
    monium chloride
    BMA210H2O250 2801 28...59250
    Bisphenol ABPA10.5ETOH270304 130 10.04/0.02270/285
    Brucine BRU13.5ETOH280327156 ...2/2280/295
    O-tert-ButylphenolBOP21CH265295 130 10.1/0.1265/275
    p-tert-ButylphenolBTP17.5CH260295 131 10.6/0.4260/280
    CarbarylCBY1.0CH285335 236 20.01285
    Carnauba waxWCA63.5CH260310 164 ...42260
    Castor oilOCA390ETOH290328 143 220 290
    OCA286CH280/320...1... ...180/300280/320
    CatecholCTC8.7H2O 265310146...0.4/0.2265/280
    4-ChloroanilineCAP17.2CH290328 136 10.2 290
    1-ChloronaphthaleneCNA11.3CH290328 334 40.1 290
    p-ChlorophenolCPN101CH260305 130 ...1/0.1260/285
    Chlorpyrifos (Duraban)DUR25.3CH 280326152...1/0.5280/295
    p-ChlorotolueneCTN23.8CH265288 129 31/0.8265/275
    p-Chloro-o-toluidineCOT25CH290328 139 10.09300
    ChryseneCRY1.0CH270383 5... ...0.002270
    Coconut oilOCC286CH290330 .........100290
    Cod liver oilOCL323CH260/280
    330
    320/320
    500
    1/1
    1
    150...260,140
    65
    260,280
    330
    Copper naphthenateCNN98CH260326 160 33/1 260/280
    Cottonseed oilOCS305CH280/320320/380.........165,300280,320
    CoumaphosCOU11.4CH320377 174 ...0.3320
    o-CresolCRO12.0CH265293 130 10.04280
    p-CresolCRP10.3CH265299 130 ...0.03280
    Cumene CUM101CH250283228 13 250
    p-CymeneCMP11.8CH260285 128 20.4/0.2260/270
    DDD DDD61.0CH240294130 24 240
    DDT DDT87CH245291228 27 245
    1,2,5,6-DibenzanthraceneDBA0.015CH 3003964...20.001300
    Dicamba DIC22.2H2O310420 170 ...0.9310
    DichlorobenilDIB108CH285312 130 ...0.6285
    2,4-Dichlorophenoxy-
    acetic acid
    DCA159CH2703101 461 30270
    DiethylbenzeneDEB100CH255283 128 20.2/0.1255/270
    Diethylene glycolDEG202CH265310 2... ...202265
    DiethylphthalateDEP145/289CH260/280300/3201/1.........280
    2,4-DimethylphenolDMH10.5CH265300 131 10.2/0.04265/280
    3,5-DimethylphenolDPM10.5CH265295 128 10.07/0.03265/280
    DiphenylamineDAM11.2
    1.2
    CH
    CH
    290
    290
    333
    333
    1
    1
    37
    37
    2
    2
    ...
    ...
    290
    290
    photochemical change
    DiphenyldichlorosilaneDDS157CH 260285230...3/2260/270
    Diquat dibromideDQD35.5H2O 31034814110.055310
    DodecylbenzeneDDB116CH250285 330 ...* 250* strong impurity
    116 CH220285330...13.6220
    Dowtherm ADTH10.8CH260305 233 20.035260
    EthylbenzeneETB103CH250283 226 ...3.1/1.5250/260
    FluorantheneFLA1.0CH360465 291 30.005360
    Gallic acidGLA103H2O 290346177...0.70290
    HydroquinoneHDQ1.1H2O 29032613810.025290
    Indene IND175CH260309232 30.12260
    Lard OLD340CH270330...... ......270
    OLD287CH2803301... ......280
    Linseed oilOLS355CH300418 1105 ...32300
    MethoxychlorMOC95CH270299 130 11.3/0.8270,280
    MethylanilineMAN10.8CH

    1. Scope

    1.1 This practice allows for the identification of 90 chemicals that may be found in water or in surface layers on water. This practice is based on the use of room-temperature fluorescence spectra taken from lists developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Coast Guard (1). Ref (1) is the primary source for these spectra. This practice is also based on the assumption that such chemicals are either present in aqueous solution or are extracted from water into an appropriate solvent.

    1.2 Although many organic chemicals containing aromatic rings, heterocyclic rings, or extended conjugated double-bond systems have appreciable quantum yields of fluorescence, this practice is designed only for the specific compounds listed. If present in complex mixtures, preseparation by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), column chromatography, or thin-layer chromatography (TLC) would probably be required.

    1.3 If used with HPLC, this practice could be used for the identification of fluorescence spectra generated by optical multichannel analyzers (OMA) or diode-array detectors.

    1.4 For simple mixtures, or in the presence of other nonfluorescing chemicals, separatory techniques might not be required. The excitation and emission maximum wavelengths listed in this practice could be used with standard fluorescence techniques (Refs 2-6) to quantitate these ninety chemicals once identification had been established. For such uses, generation of a calibration curve, to determine the linear range for use of fluorescence quantitation would be required for each chemical. Examination of solvent blanks to subtract or eliminate any fluorescence background would probably be required.

    1.5 This standard does not purport to address the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.


    2. Referenced Documents (purchase separately) The documents listed below are referenced within the subject standard but are not provided as part of the standard.

    ASTM Standards

    D1129 Terminology Relating to Water

    D1193 Specification for Reagent Water

    E131 Terminology Relating to Molecular Spectroscopy

    E275 Practice for Describing and Measuring Performance of Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrophotometers


    ICS Code

    ICS Number Code 13.060.50 (Examination of water for chemical substances)

    UNSPSC Code

    UNSPSC Code


    Referencing This Standard

    DOI: 10.1520/D4763-06R12

    ASTM International is a member of CrossRef.

    Citation Format

    ASTM D4763-06(2012), Standard Practice for Identification of Chemicals in Water by Fluorescence Spectroscopy, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA, 2012, www.astm.org

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