ASTM C1386-07

    Standard Specification for Precast Autoclaved Aerated Concrete (AAC) Wall Construction Units (Withdrawn 2013)

    Withdrawn Standard: ASTM C1386-07 | Developed by Subcommittee: C27.60

    WITHDRAWN, NO REPLACEMENT


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    Withdrawn Rationale:

    This specification covered solid nonload-bearing and load-bearing precast concrete wall units made from autoclaved aerated concrete. Precast autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) is a cementitious product based on calcium silicate hydrates in which low density is attained by the inclusion of an agent resulting in macroscopic voids and is subjected to high-pressure steam curing. The precast autoclaved aerated concrete wall units are large-size solid rectangular prisms, which are to be laid using thin-bed mortar. Installed units covered by this specification shall be protected against direct exposure to moisture using a coating material accepted by the AAC manufacturer.

    Formerly under the jurisdiction of Committee C27 on Precast Concrete Products, this specification was withdrawn in November 2013. This standard is being withdrawn without replacement due to its limited use by industry.

    1. Scope

    1.1 This specification covers solid nonload-bearing and load-bearing precast concrete wall units made from autoclaved aerated concrete. Precast autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) is a cementitious product based on calcium silicate hydrates in which low density is attained by the inclusion of an agent resulting in macroscopic voids and is subjected to high-pressure steam curing. The precast autoclaved aerated concrete wall units are large-size solid rectangular prisms, which are to be laid using thin-bed mortar. Installed units covered by this specification shall be protected against direct exposure to moisture using a coating material accepted by the AAC manufacturer.

    1.2 The raw materials used in the production of precast autoclaved aerated concrete are portland cement, quartz sand, water, lime, gypsum or anhydrite, and an agent resulting in macroscopic voids. The quartz sand used as a raw material may be replaced by a siliceous fine aggregate other than sand, and usually is ground to a fine powder before use. Fly ash may be used as a sand replacement. The batched raw materials are mixed thoroughly together to form a slurry. The slurry is cast into steel molds. Due to the chemical reactions that take place within the slurry, the volume expands. After setting, and before hardening, the mass is machine cut into units of various sizes. The units then are steam-cured under pressure in autoclaves where the material is transformed into a hard calcium silicate.

    1.3 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only.

    1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. See Section 8, Section 9, and Section 10.



    2. Referenced Documents (purchase separately) The documents listed below are referenced within the subject standard but are not provided as part of the standard.

    ASTM Standards

    C22/C22M Specification for Gypsum

    C33 Specification for Concrete Aggregates

    C144 Specification for Aggregate for Masonry Mortar

    C150 Specification for Portland Cement

    C332 Specification for Lightweight Aggregates for Insulating Concrete

    C595 Specification for Blended Hydraulic Cements

    C618 Specification for Coal Fly Ash and Raw or Calcined Natural Pozzolan for Use in Concrete

    E4 Practices for Force Verification of Testing Machines


    DOI: 10.1520/C1386-07

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