STP167

    The Availability and Demand Outlook, Distribution, and Principal Properties of Domestic Diesel Fuels

    Published: Jan 1954


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    Abstract

    The petroleum industry is vitally interested in the supply, demand, and distribution of diesel fuel oils, and through the American Petroleum Inst., the Bureau of Mines, and other sources, it keeps in contact with the ever increasing demand. Diesel fuel oil is middle distillate with a cultural background and in reality covers two quality grades—regular and premium. It is unfortunate that trade circles still use Diesel Index—generally 55 to 58 D.I.—as the dividing line instead of cetane number, ASTM Method D 613, or Calculated Cetane Index. A mixed outlook for potential diesel engine sales in 1954 is envisioned. New sales to railroads, highway transportation, and agriculture are expected to be lower in 1954 than in 1953. However, sales of diesel engines to general industry, to construction, mining, marine, and petroleum companies, and to municipal projects will be greater this year. Analysts foresee a good year ahead for the diesel industry. The five-year totals for the nine major categories covered are given in Table I. Since larger percentages of oil supplies are to come from areas outside of the United States, Fig. 1 is of interest since it shows the world petroleum demand and world petroleum supply, as well as the United States' position in this up- ward trend of supply and demand through 1956. Developments in global needs are dependent upon political as well as economic factors.


    Author Information:

    Larson, C. M.
    Chief Consulting Engineer, Sinclair Refining Co., New York, N. Y.


    Paper ID: STP48303S

    Committee/Subcommittee: D02.E0

    DOI: 10.1520/STP48303S


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