STP352

    Concentration of Fine Particles and Lead in Car Exhaust

    Published: Jan 1963


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    Abstract

    The objectives of this study were to obtain information, by using several new sampling methods, concerning the concentration of fine particles and their lead content in the exhaust of several cars operated under cruising conditions and to examine the effects of car, speed, and type of lead antiknock fuel additive on these concentrations.

    The concentrations in the exhaust from the group of cars studied were not significantly affected by variations in car, speed, fuel antiknock additive, or interaction between car and speed. The observed fine particle exhaust concentration under cruising conditions was of approximately the same magnitude as a calculated estimation of total particulate concentration in the exhaust from cars operated under a standard urban driving cycle. The particle size distribution indicated from 62 to 80 per cent by weight of exhaust particulates generated under cruising conditions was smaller than 2 μ. Of these fine particles, more than 68 per cent by weight were smaller than 0.3 μ. The lead content of the fine particles obtained in each test was affected by interaction between car and speed. The average lead content amounted to about 40 per cent. The concentration levels and size distribution of fine particles and their lead content which may be emitted from modern automobiles are indicated. A method for estimating the contribution of auto exhaust aerosol to atmospheric aerosol has been suggested.


    Author Information:

    Mueller, P. K.
    Chief, Air and Industrial Hygiene Laboratory; Chief, Cancer Biochemistry Laboratory; Spectroscopist, Assistant Public Health Chemist, and Associate Public Health Chemist, Air and Industrial Hygiene Laboratory, California Dept. of Public Health, Berkeley, Calif.

    Helwig, H. L.
    Chief, Air and Industrial Hygiene Laboratory; Chief, Cancer Biochemistry Laboratory; Spectroscopist, Assistant Public Health Chemist, and Associate Public Health Chemist, Air and Industrial Hygiene Laboratory, California Dept. of Public Health, Berkeley, Calif.

    Alcocer, A. E.
    Chief, Air and Industrial Hygiene Laboratory; Chief, Cancer Biochemistry Laboratory; Spectroscopist, Assistant Public Health Chemist, and Associate Public Health Chemist, Air and Industrial Hygiene Laboratory, California Dept. of Public Health, Berkeley, Calif.

    Gong, W. K.
    Chief, Air and Industrial Hygiene Laboratory; Chief, Cancer Biochemistry Laboratory; Spectroscopist, Assistant Public Health Chemist, and Associate Public Health Chemist, Air and Industrial Hygiene Laboratory, California Dept. of Public Health, Berkeley, Calif.

    Jones, E. E.
    Chief, Air and Industrial Hygiene Laboratory; Chief, Cancer Biochemistry Laboratory; Spectroscopist, Assistant Public Health Chemist, and Associate Public Health Chemist, Air and Industrial Hygiene Laboratory, California Dept. of Public Health, Berkeley, Calif.


    Paper ID: STP45109S

    Committee/Subcommittee: D22.05

    DOI: 10.1520/STP45109S


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