STP254: Powder versus Slurry Application of Lime for Soil Stabilization

    Davidson, D. T.
    Professor of Civil Engineering, former Graduate Student, and Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, Iowa Engineering Experiment Station, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa

    G., Noguera
    Professor of Civil Engineering, former Graduate Student, and Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, Iowa Engineering Experiment Station, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa

    Sheeler, J. B.
    Professor of Civil Engineering, former Graduate Student, and Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, Iowa Engineering Experiment Station, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa

    Pages: 10    Published: Jan 1960


    Abstract

    The use of lime in soil stabilization is rapidly gaining acceptance. Both hydrated and quicklime have proved successful. Quicklime is less expensive and more effective, but hydrated lime is easier and safer to handle in the powdered state. A possible answer to the safer use of quicklime as a soil stabilizer lies in its application in the form of a slurry.

    In this paper the effectiveness of limes in slurry form when applied to silty and to clayey soils is evaluated and the results are compared with stabilization by the use of limes in powdered form.

    Slurries of lime were found to be easily applied and produced unconfined compressive strengths equivalent to strengths obtained through the use of powdered lime. Quicklimes in slurries produced higher strengths than those used in powdered form. Hydrated limes—powdered or in slurries—gave about equivalent strengths. The dolomitic limes were superior to the calcitic limes. The amounts of either type of lime required for near maximum 7- and 28-day strengths were found to be economical.


    Paper ID: STP44322S

    Committee/Subcommittee: D18.15

    DOI: 10.1520/STP44322S


    CrossRef ASTM International is a member of CrossRef.