STP317

    Transmission Electron Microscopy of Type 410 Stainless Steels

    Published: Jan 1962


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    Abstract

    A thin metal film for direct-transmission electron microscopy was first prepared by Heidenreich (1), using an electrolytic thinning technique based on the principles of electropolishing. Since that time, various modifications of the electrolytic thinning technique as well as other methods have been developed which involve chemical dissolution (2), mechanical deformation (2), ion bombardment (3), vacuum deposition (4), or chemical etching (5). Of all these methods, electrolytic thinning has been the most successful approach and is also the most widely applicable technique because it introduces least deviation in structure from the bulk material. Although the precise mechanism of electrolytic thinning has not been clearly established, many improvements in technique have been empirically devised. For example, preferential thinning at the specimen edges has been reduced by coating the edge with nonconductive lacquers, and by using point-cathode geometry (6). These developments were recently reviewed in detail (7).


    Author Information:

    Capenos, J. M.
    Staff Microscopist, Associate Metallurgist, and Supervisor, Crucible Steel Co. of America, Pittsburgh, Pa

    Hauser, J. J.
    Staff Microscopist, Associate Metallurgist, and Supervisor, Crucible Steel Co. of America, Pittsburgh, Pa

    Banerjee, B. R.
    Staff Microscopist, Associate Metallurgist, and Supervisor, Crucible Steel Co. of America, Pittsburgh, Pa


    Paper ID: STP43675S

    Committee/Subcommittee: E04.01

    DOI: 10.1520/STP43675S


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