STP169: Lightweight Concrete and Aggregates

    Davis, RE
    Director Emeritus, Engineering Materials Laboratory, and Professor of Civil Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Calif.

    Kelly, TW
    Director Emeritus, Engineering Materials Laboratory, and Professor of Civil Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Calif.

    Pages: 12    Published: Jan 1956


    Abstract

    Lightweight concrete as discussed in this paper is that having a unit weight of less than about 120 lb per cu ft; thus it includes sand-cinder concrete but excludes concrete with air-cooled blastfurnace slag as the coarse aggregate. Lightweight concretes are of three principal types: 1. Structural.—Monolithic lightweight concrete for buildings, floors, roofs, load-bearing partitions, bridge decks, ships, etc. The main purpose is the reduction of weight and economy in design. Other desirable characteristics of lightweight concrete such as workability and strength are identical with those for plastic concrete containing aggregates of normal weight. 2. Masonry Units.—Machine-made units for walls and partitions either load-bearing or nonload-bearing; also used in prestressed floor and wall assemblies. In addition to the requisite light weight and moderate strength, it is usually desired that the assembly of units be insulating and sound-deadening. Lightweight masonry units are seldom used in exposed locations without a weather-resistant coating or covering. 3. Insulation or Fill.—Monolithic light-weight concrete for overcoating or forming partitions and walls, or for floor and roof fills. Precast units or panels may be employed. Lightness and a high degree of insulation are desired; strength is not important. The concrete may even be “cellular,” containing no aggregate, or at least no coarse aggregate, with cellular structure achieved through foaming or gas-forming (11).


    Paper ID: STP39437S

    Committee/Subcommittee: C09.21

    DOI: 10.1520/STP39437S


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