STP664

    A Study of Erosion by High-Pressure Cavitating and Noncavitating Waterjets

    Published: Jan 1979


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    Abstract

    A study was made of erosion by high-pressure noncavitating and cavitating waterjets issuing from five different arrangements of nozzles, consisting of (A) jet in air, (B) submerged jet, (C) jet surrounded by another of lower velocity, (D) jet from long nozzles, and (E) jet from a nozzle containing a cylindrical body insert. The purpose was to evaluate the two methods of erosion for jet cutting applications.

    Simple visual examination of the craters on specimens of copper showed distinct type (size, shape, depth, etc.) of erosion. However, microscopic examination did not reveal clearly any characteristics peculiar to cavitating or noncavitating jets.

    Quantitative experimental results were obtained by measuring the mass loss of lead specimens as a function of time of exposure for the conditions where either the nozzle pressure or the standoff distance was held constant. By comparing the different arrangements on the basis of material loss, it is concluded that Arrangement B performed best for all periods of exposure and standoff distances followed by Arrangement C for short periods of exposure, smaller standoff distance, and for certain flow conditions.

    Keywords:

    erosion, high pressure, cavitating, noncavitating, water jet, jet cutting applications, nozzle, crater, mass loss, lead and copper specimens, time of exposure, nozzle pressure, nozzle diameter, standoff distance, submerged jet, arrangement, evaluation, comparison, material removal, penetration


    Author Information:

    Vijay, MM
    Research officer and technical officer, Gas Dynamics Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering Division, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario

    Brierley, WH
    Research officer and technical officer, Gas Dynamics Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering Division, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario


    Paper ID: STP35815S

    Committee/Subcommittee: G02.10

    DOI: 10.1520/STP35815S


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