STP680

    Testing the Responses of Coyotes and Other Predators to Odor Attractants

    Published: Jun 1979


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    Abstract

    A standardized evaluation method was developed and used to compare statistically the efficacy and selectivity of predatory animal lures. A modified scentstation technique included one or more lines with 100 or more stations each, which were placed along unpaved roads in four states.

    The exposure of 47 255 perforated plastic capsules containing candidate attractants during a 28-month period yielded 8091 coyote visits and 9474 behavioral responses. Data were obtained on nine additional carnivore species and eleven other animal taxa. Analyses of coyote data indicated significant differences in visit rates and behavioral responses in several categories, including biting and pulling up the lure capsules. Comparisons of mean coyote visit rates for all test lures indicated that DRC-6500, a concentrated synthetic equivalent of a fermented egg synthesized by Denver Center personnel, was the best attractant in nearly all tests. The scent-station technique appears to be reliable for evaluating the relative attractiveness of lures. Comparisons of candidate samples to a base attractant and the resulting indexes will allow animal damage control personnel and researchers to field test the efficacy of candidate lures.

    Keywords:

    vertebrate pest control, coyote, attractant, test methods


    Author Information:

    Turkowski, FJ
    Research biologist, biological technician, and research chemist, Denver Wildlife Research Center, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Lakewood, Colo

    Popelka, ML
    Research biologist, biological technician, and research chemist, Denver Wildlife Research Center, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Lakewood, Colo

    Green, BB
    Research technician, Texas A & M University Research and Extension Center, Uvalde, Texas

    Bullard, RW
    Research biologist, biological technician, and research chemist, Denver Wildlife Research Center, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Lakewood, Colo


    Paper ID: STP34982S

    Committee/Subcommittee: E35.17

    DOI: 10.1520/STP34982S


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