STP821

    Slow-Strain-Rate Stress Corrosion Testing of Aluminum Alloys

    Published: Jan 1984


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    Abstract

    An extensive program of slow-strain-rate stress corrosion testing of aluminum alloys in a wide variety of susceptibility conditions and environments produced results fully consistent with the expected behavior from service experience and the results of other established test methods. Tests were conducted both on laboratory alloys in sheet form and on commercial alloys in wire, sheet, and plate forms; the systems studied included Al-Zn-Mg, Al-Zn-Mg-Cu, Al-Cu-Mg, and Al-Mg. Suitable strain rate regimes for testing, standard environments, and optimum stress corrosion susceptibility parameters were established. In general, a rate of 10−6/s was found to be appropriate for 2000 and 7000 series alloys and 10−4/s for 5000 series alloys. The most effective test environment was found to be 3% NaCl + 0.3% H2O2 for all alloys tested, and in general either relative elongation or reduction in area was the most meaningful susceptibility assessment parameter.

    Keywords:

    slow-strain-rate testing, stress corrosion cracking, aluminum alloys, Al-Zn-Mg, Al-Zn-Mg-Cu, Al-Cu-Mg, Al-Mg, reduction-in-area ratio, elongation ratio


    Author Information:

    Holrody, NJH
    Senior Metallurgist and Principal Scientist, Alcan International Limited, Banbury, Oxon

    Scamans, GM
    Senior Metallurgist and Principal Scientist, Alcan International Limited, Banbury, Oxon


    Paper ID: STP34434S

    Committee/Subcommittee: G01.06

    DOI: 10.1520/STP34434S


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