STP955: Nickel Ion Irradiation Effects on the Microstructure of 2 1/4% Cr 1% Mo Steel and a Comparison with Neutron Irradiation Data

    Kai, J-J
    Assistant professor, research engineer, research scientist, professor of metallurgical engineering, and Grainger professor of nuclear engineering and director, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

    Sindelar, RL
    Assistant professor, research engineer, research scientist, professor of metallurgical engineering, and Grainger professor of nuclear engineering and director, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

    Plumton, DL
    Assistant professor, research engineer, research scientist, professor of metallurgical engineering, and Grainger professor of nuclear engineering and director, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

    Dodd, RA
    Assistant professor, research engineer, research scientist, professor of metallurgical engineering, and Grainger professor of nuclear engineering and director, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

    Kulcinski, GL
    Assistant professor, research engineer, research scientist, professor of metallurgical engineering, and Grainger professor of nuclear engineering and director, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

    Pages: 7    Published: Jan 1987


    Abstract

    A 2 1/4 Cr 1% Mo steel, heat treated to consist of upper and lower bainite and ferrite, has been shown to undergo substantial microstructural modification when irradiated with 14-MeV nickel ions at 500°C to 350 dpa at the peak damage depth. The original cementite (Fe3C) in upper and lower bainite was replaced by Chi phase, M7C3 and M2C in upper bainite, and Chi and M7C3 in lower bainite. The originally precipitate-free ferrite contained a significant fraction of G phase after irradiation. The replacement of Fe3C by M7C3 and M2C is consistent with the fact that M7C3 and M2C form in a quenched and tempered 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo steel, but at higher tempering temperatures than does Fe3C. On the other hand, Chi and G phases have not been reported to occur in this steel as a result of thermal treatments. The steel is resistant to void swelling, which amounted to 0.2% or less even at the rather high dpa levels employed in this study. The quantitative data for precipitate and void number densities and sizes agree quite well with a companion neutron irradiation study of the same steel possessing an identical microstructure.

    Keywords:

    Ion irradiation, ferritic steel, microstructural modification, void swelling, helium, precipitate extraction replica, transmission electron microscopy, analytical electron microscopy


    Paper ID: STP33845S

    Committee/Subcommittee: E10.07

    DOI: 10.1520/STP33845S


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