STP891

    The Effects of an Acidic River, Caused by Acidic Rain, on Weight Gain, Steroidogenesis, and Reproduction in the Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)

    Published: Jan 1985


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    Abstract

    In 1981, wild male Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) captured in the low pH (pH 4.7) Westfield River, Nova Scotia, Canada, had lower plasma androgen levels at sexual maturity compared to levels in wild male salmon sampled in the nearby less acidic (pH 5.6) Medway River. In 1982, Atlantic salmon held in cages and fed daily in the Westfield River (pH range 5.1 to 5.3) during the last three months of their sexual maturation cycle gained less weight, produced smaller eggs, and had abnormal steroid hormone metabolism compared to similar fish held in the less acidic Medway River (pH range 5.4 to 6.1). The mortality of eggs taken and fertilized from salmon held in the Westfield River exceeded 90% while the mortality of eggs from the Medway River salmon was 59%.

    Keywords:

    aquatic toxicology, aquatic biology, reproduction (biology), sublethal toxicity test, acid rain, steroidogenesis, Atlantic salmon


    Author Information:

    Freeman, HC
    Research scientist and research associate, Fisheries and Environmental Sciences Division, Fisheries Research Branch, Scotia—Fundy Region, Halifax Fisheries Research Laboratory, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Halifax, Nova Scotia

    Sangalang, GB
    Research scientist and research associate, Fisheries and Environmental Sciences Division, Fisheries Research Branch, Scotia—Fundy Region, Halifax Fisheries Research Laboratory, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Halifax, Nova Scotia


    Paper ID: STP33585S

    Committee/Subcommittee: E47.01

    DOI: 10.1520/STP33585S


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