STP891

    Effects of Triethylene Glycol on Mysidopsis bahia (Crustacea: Mysidacea) and Menidia peninsulae (Pisces: Atherinidae)

    Published: Jan 1985


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    Abstract

    Chronic effects of triethylene glycol (TEG), a chemical frequently used as a carrier-solvent in toxicity tests, were investigated in a 23-day life-cycle toxicity test with a mysid (Mysidopsis bahia) and in a 28-day early life-stage toxicity test with the tidewater silverside (Menidia peninsulae). Test organisms were exposed to the same range of concentrations: seawater control, 3.2, 10, 32, 100, 320, and 1000 mg/L. Effects, if any, were measured by survival and reproduction for the mysids and survival and growth for the silversides. We concluded that no direct adverse effect should be expected as a result of using TEG at concentrations as high as 100 000 times (mysids) and 360 times (tidewater silversides) those recommended in ASTM drafts of standard practices (≤0.01 μL/L in Mysidopsis bahia life-cycle tests and ≤0.01 μL/L in tests with early life-stages of Menidia peninsulae) and that either a seawater or a TEG control may not be necessary.

    Keywords:

    life cycles, aquatic biology, toxicity, chronic toxicity, triethylene glycol, Mysidopsis bahia, mysid, Menidia peninsulae, tidewater silverside, aquatic toxicology


    Author Information:

    Montgomery, RM
    Research associate and professor of biology, The University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL

    Forester, J
    Physical science technician, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Environmental Research Laboratory, Gulf Breeze, FL

    D'Asaro, CN
    Research associate and professor of biology, The University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL


    Paper ID: STP33578S

    Committee/Subcommittee: E47.01

    DOI: 10.1520/STP33578S


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