STP859

    Estimation of In Vivo Type 316L Stainless Steel Corrosion Rate from Blood Transport and Organ Accumulation Data

    Published: Jan 1985


      Format Pages Price  
    PDF Version (376K) 25 $25   ADD TO CART
    Complete Source PDF (9.1M) 25 $68   ADD TO CART


    Abstract

    A model utilizing implanted Type 316L stainless steel in laboratory rabbits was developed to investigate the systemic transport and distribution of constituent iron and chromium corrosion products. Results utilizing flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry indicate that levels of circulating iron and chromium in the blood-transport compartment reflect the implanted surface area of Type 316L stainless steel. A similar positive correlation was found between implanted Type 316L stainless steel surface area and liver (reticuloendothelial) accumulations of iron and chromium. The kidney, having no reticuloendothelial capacity, demonstrated no constituent element accumulations.

    Approximate corrosion rates of Type 316L stainless steel were calculated by: (1) superimposing the observed plasma iron elevations on transport compartment size and plasma iron kinetics, and by (2) evaluating storage site accumulations of iron and chromium over time. All calculations are consistent with Type 316L stainless steel's reported corrosion rate as measured by more precise in vitro and in vivo analytical techniques (20 to 300 ng/cm2/day).

    Although the clinical significance of these findings is presently indeterminable, it is clear that the biological system as a whole must be considered when assessing the longterm biocompatibility of implanted Type 316L stainless steel.

    Keywords:

    corrosion, biocompatibility, animal model, systemic effects, iron metabolism, chromium, trace elements, organ accumulations, atomic absorption spectrophotometry, implant materials, stainless steels


    Author Information:

    Smith, GK
    Assistant professor and associate professor, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

    Black, J
    Assistant professor and associate professor, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA


    Paper ID: STP33255S

    Committee/Subcommittee: F04.48

    DOI: 10.1520/STP33255S


    CrossRef ASTM International is a member of CrossRef.