STP872

    Pulmonary Effects of Inhaled Sulfur Dioxide in Atopic Adolescent Subjects: A Review

    Published: Jan 1985


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    Abstract

    Atopic adolescent subjects with and without hypersensitive airways, as defined by responses to exercise challenge and methacholine challenge, have been studied during acute exposure to 1 ppm sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sodium chloride (NaCl) droplet aerosol. Changes in lung function following exposure were assessed by measuring total respiratory resistance, maximum flow at 50 and 75% of vital capacity, and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). Atopic adolescent subjects with extrinsic asthma and exercise-induced bronchospasm were extremely susceptible to inhaled SO2 at the concentration used. As a group they showed a 23% decrease in FEV1 and a 67% increase in total respiratory resistance, and some had symptoms of wheezing and shortness of breath. On the other hand, atopic adolescent subjects with no signs of airway hypersensitivity were no more susceptible to inhaled SO2 than were a group of healthy adolescent subjects studied for comparison.

    Keywords:

    atopic, adolescent, sulfur dioxide (SO, 2, ), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV, 1, ), exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB), inhalation toxicology, air pollution


    Author Information:

    Koenig, JQ
    Research associate professor, Department of Environmental Health, and clinical professor, Departments of Environmental Health and Pediatrics, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

    Pierson, WE
    Research associate professor, Department of Environmental Health, and clinical professor, Departments of Environmental Health and Pediatrics, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA


    Paper ID: STP32847S

    Committee/Subcommittee: D22.01

    DOI: 10.1520/STP32847S


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