STP796: Preliminary Clinical Analysis of Mechanical Performance of the STH Titanium Alloy Total Hip Replacement

    Zych, G
    Chief of orthopedic trauma service and assistant professor, director of research and assistant professor, and chief of musculoskeletal oncology and professor of orthopedic surgery, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Fla.

    Latta, LL
    Chief of orthopedic trauma service and assistant professor, director of research and assistant professor, and chief of musculoskeletal oncology and professor of orthopedic surgery, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Fla.

    Mnaymneh, W
    Chief of orthopedic trauma service and assistant professor, director of research and assistant professor, and chief of musculoskeletal oncology and professor of orthopedic surgery, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Fla.

    Pages: 22    Published: Jan 1983


    Abstract

    Total hip replacement has been performed with the STH titanium alloy femoral stem at the University of Miami School of Medicine consistently since 1976. During the period of 1976 through 1980, eight different staff surgeons and many residents operated on 154 patients and performed 178 total hip replacements utilizing this device. A retrospective analysis of hip replacements in 52 patients from this group who could be adequately followed is reported, utilizing subjective and objective measures of early results. The prosthesis was designed to prevent fracture of femoral component stems, decrease proximal lysis of the femur, decrease femoral component loosening, and provide a prosthesis that could be easily implantable while maintaining good reconstructive procedure about the hip. Since the implementation of the first prosthesis questions about the use of such a design have been raised regarding the vulnerability of titanium to wear and the vulnerability of the proximal cement around the titanium stem to premature failure. The short-term clinical and radiographic results were comparable to those of other series of more conventional total hip replacements. The mechanical reconstruction of the hip and cement failure were comparable, and lysis of the proximal bone was favorably comparable to early results of previous series. Concerns about abnormal wear cannot be supported by the in vivo data in this study.

    Keywords:

    titanium implants, total hip replacement, joint reconstruction biomechanics, implant wear, implant materials, titanium alloys


    Paper ID: STP28941S

    Committee/Subcommittee: F04.48

    DOI: 10.1520/STP28941S


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