STP777: Subsurface Variability—The Key to Investigation of Coral Atoll

    Angemeer, J
    Division manager, and senior geotechnical engineer, McClelland Engineers, Inc., San Francisco, Calif.

    McNeilan, TW
    Division manager, and senior geotechnical engineer, McClelland Engineers, Inc., San Francisco, Calif.

    Pages: 18    Published: Jan 1982


    Abstract

    Coral atolls are one of the most complex and variable foundation environments in which carbonate materials are encountered. Unlike most terrigenous deposits where the presence of bedrock resolves most foundation problems, in coralline deposits loose particulate material or cavities can underlie rock. If, however, the subsurface profile is reasonably consistent, the bearing capacity of shallow foundations in these carbonates is good and can be evaluated with conventional analytic techniques. Hence, assessing the variability and adequately delineating the subsurface profile are key factors in field investigations. Since atolls are often remote, investigations consisting of a number of conventional borings are often sufficient for simple bearing structures. Driven probes to supplement limited boring data are potentially advantageous. For more complex structures, the behavior of atoll carbonates necessitates that field investigation requirements be evaluated for the specific project.

    Keywords:

    coral atoll, carbonate deposits, subsurface investigation, bearing capacity, California Bearing Ratio test, plate load test


    Paper ID: STP28909S

    Committee/Subcommittee: D18.01

    DOI: 10.1520/STP28909S


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