STP753

    Formability of the Next Generation of High-Strength Low-Alloy Steels: The Effects of Low Temperatures and Processing Conditions

    Published: Jan 1982


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    Abstract

    To meet the challenge of transporting mineral and energy resources from the Canadian North as well as the need to conserve materials and energy, many new high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels have been and are being developed. This paper presents the results of the effect of low-temperature environments on steels. Four Arctic HSLA steels, a dual-phase steel, three experimental HSLA weathering steels and three experimental boron-HSLA steels have been used in the study. Tension tests have been carried out from room temperature to −196°C (−321°F) to evaluate the formability parameters (mainly uniform elongation and strain hardening exponent). Instrumented impact tests have also been carried out on the dual-phase steel to study its ductility under high rates of deformation. The relevance of this study to formability practice (in situ as well as “shop”) of HSLA steels are pointed up. The areas where further work is needed are also discussed.

    Keywords:

    high-strength low-alloy steels, formability, low temperatures, alloying (copper, columbium, boron), controlled rolling, aging


    Author Information:

    Krishnadev, MR
    Associate professor, graduate students, and student, Laval University, Quebec,

    Cutler, LR
    Associate professor, graduate students, and student, Laval University, Quebec,

    Sojka, GJ
    Associate professor, graduate students, and student, Laval University, Quebec,

    Guérette, J
    Associate professor, graduate students, and student, Laval University, Quebec,


    Paper ID: STP28398S

    Committee/Subcommittee: E28.02

    DOI: 10.1520/STP28398S


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