STP725: Comparison of High-Fluence Swelling Behavior of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Weiner, RA
    Senior scientist and manager, Fuel Materials Technology, Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division, Madison, Pa.

    Boltax, A
    Senior scientist and manager, Fuel Materials Technology, Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division, Madison, Pa.

    Pages: 16    Published: Jan 1981


    Abstract

    High-fluence swelling data on stabilized and unstabilized austenitic stainless steels are reviewed with the goal of understanding compositional and thermomechanical treatment effects on swelling behavior. Data on Types 304, 316, 321, titanium-modified 316, 4970, and FV548 are considered. Comparison of the Type 304 and Type 316 data indicates that molybdenum may play a key role in the high swelling rates found for Type 316 stainless steel above 550°C, perhaps because molybdenum is required for the phase instabilities and precipitate evolution responsible for segregating nickel from the 316 matrix at these temperatures. The data on the titanium- and niobium-modified austenitic steels indicate that, for fast fluence levels up to 1.2 × 1023 neutrons/cm2, these elements suppress swelling for irradiation temperatures above 525°C, thus effectively shifting the peak swelling temperature to below 500°C for steels with the Type 316 base composition. Experimental results from EBR-II, Rapsodie, Phenix, and the Dounreay Fast Reactor indicate that stabilized and cold-worked austenitic alloys with a Type 316 stainless steel base composition will have significantly lower swelling than the unstabilized base composition.

    Keywords:

    radiation, stainless steels, swelling, fast reactors, alloy modifications


    Paper ID: STP28231S

    Committee/Subcommittee: E10.02

    DOI: 10.1520/STP28231S


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