STP608: Evaluating Engineering Alloys in Compression

    Chait, R
    Supervisory materials engineer and general engineer, Army Materials and Mechanics Research Center, Watertown, Mass.

    Curll, CH
    Supervisory materials engineer and general engineer, Army Materials and Mechanics Research Center, Watertown, Mass.

    Pages: 17    Published: Jan 1976


    Abstract

    Testing in compression has several attractive features when compared to the more frequently employed tension test. To take full advantage of these features, it is necessary to obtain deformation that is as close to homogeneous as possible. This paper describes how homogeneous compression can be obtained, paying particular attention to specimen dimensions and lubrication techniques. Comparison is made to deformation under nonhomogeneous conditions. Stress-strain curves obtained in compression for various engineering materials are presented. These curves represent uniform or homogeneous compression. For some metals, there is excellent agreement between the compressive flow curves and those obtained in tension, provided the latter is corrected for necking. However, it is shown that, for high-strength steels, there is not the expected agreement between the compressive and tensile flow curves. The resistance to compressive deformation is greater than to tensile deformation. This effect, termed a strength differential effect, is shown to be independent of the amount of plastic strain. However, it is affected by temperature, since it increases as the temperature is lowered.

    Keywords:

    mechanical tests, compression tests, deformation, stresses, strains, lubrication, tensile properties, compressive properties


    Paper ID: STP27852S

    Committee/Subcommittee: E28.94

    DOI: 10.1520/STP27852S


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