STP735

    Monitoring Acrolein in Naturally Occurring Systems

    Published: Jan 1981


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    Abstract

    Acrolein is an important biocide and sulfide scavenger for oil-field systems. Acrolein monitoring procedures usually involve both concentration and performance determinations. These procedures can provide useful information only when meaningful methods are employed.

    Acrolein concentrations may be determined analytically by derivatization methods such as m-aminophenol fluorescence and dinitrophenylhydrazine colorimetry. Derivatization methods can be used only in special situations because numerous interferences are usually present. Direct analytical methods such as ultraviolet spectroscopy and differential pulse polarography are generally more useful. An analytical method should be used only after careful studies have shown it to be reliable, suitable, and parallel to the desired performance in the given application.

    In most cases, monitoring acrolein is best done by determining its performance in each specific application. When used as a biocide, acrolein is more accurately evaluated by standard American Petroleum Institute (API) procedures than by present adenosinetriphosphate (ATP) methods. Growth in aerobic plates and anaerobic culture tubes is normally absent at typical use concentrations even though ATP readings generally register low kills. Acrolein appears to alter the mechanism of light emission by ATP.

    When used to scavenge sulfides, acrolein performance is best evaluated by a sulfide specific ion electrode, because results can be misleading when determined by lead or methylene blue colorimetry. This conclusion was obtained when colorimetric methods were compared with the data from sulfide specific ion electrode determinations calibrated against lead perchlorate titrations.

    Keywords:

    acrolein detection, bioassay, differential pulse polarography, hydrogen sulfide detection, sulfide ion electrode, water analysis, water, water injection


    Author Information:

    Kissel, CL
    Group leader, project leader, project leader, research chemist, chemist, and vice president of Research and Development, Magna Corporation, Santa Fe Springs, Calif.

    Brady, JL
    Group leader, project leader, project leader, research chemist, chemist, and vice president of Research and Development, Magna Corporation, Santa Fe Springs, Calif.

    Guerra, AM
    Group leader, project leader, project leader, research chemist, chemist, and vice president of Research and Development, Magna Corporation, Santa Fe Springs, Calif.

    Meshishnek, MJ
    Group leader, project leader, project leader, research chemist, chemist, and vice president of Research and Development, Magna Corporation, Santa Fe Springs, Calif.

    Rockie, BA
    Group leader, project leader, project leader, research chemist, chemist, and vice president of Research and Development, Magna Corporation, Santa Fe Springs, Calif.

    Caserio, FF
    Group leader, project leader, project leader, research chemist, chemist, and vice president of Research and Development, Magna Corporation, Santa Fe Springs, Calif.


    Paper ID: STP27657S

    Committee/Subcommittee: D19.31

    DOI: 10.1520/STP27657S


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