STP721: Organics in Air: Sampling and Identification

    Schlitt, H
    Research engineers, Head of Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Group, and Head of Applied Organic Chemistry Sector, Applied Organic Chemistry sector, Commission of the European Communities, Joint Research Center, Ispra Establishment, Chemistry Div., Ispra (VA),

    Knoeppel, H
    Research engineers, Head of Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Group, and Head of Applied Organic Chemistry Sector, Applied Organic Chemistry sector, Commission of the European Communities, Joint Research Center, Ispra Establishment, Chemistry Div., Ispra (VA),

    Versino, B
    Research engineers, Head of Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Group, and Head of Applied Organic Chemistry Sector, Applied Organic Chemistry sector, Commission of the European Communities, Joint Research Center, Ispra Establishment, Chemistry Div., Ispra (VA),

    Peil, A
    Research engineers, Head of Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Group, and Head of Applied Organic Chemistry Sector, Applied Organic Chemistry sector, Commission of the European Communities, Joint Research Center, Ispra Establishment, Chemistry Div., Ispra (VA),

    Schauenburg, H
    Research engineers, Head of Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Group, and Head of Applied Organic Chemistry Sector, Applied Organic Chemistry sector, Commission of the European Communities, Joint Research Center, Ispra Establishment, Chemistry Div., Ispra (VA),

    Vissers, H
    Research engineers, Head of Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Group, and Head of Applied Organic Chemistry Sector, Applied Organic Chemistry sector, Commission of the European Communities, Joint Research Center, Ispra Establishment, Chemistry Div., Ispra (VA),

    Pages: 14    Published: Jan 1980


    Abstract

    Various complementary methods have been developed for the analysis of organic compounds in air, taking into account their different physicochemical and detection characteristics: 1. Gaseous hydrocarbons (boiling point range, C2 to C5) are adsorbed on a carbon molecular sieve (CMS), separated on a packed alumina column, and detected by a flame ionization detector (FID). 2. Halogenated hydrocarbons are also adsorbed on CMS, separated on a glass capillary column, and detected by an electron capture detector (ECD). 3. Other volatile organics are adsorbed on Tenax gas chromatographic adsorbent, separated on glass capillary columns, and detected by FID and a computerized mass spectrometer. 4. Aerosols are sampled on glass-fiber filters and extracted, and the extract is analyzed by a computerized gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer.

    The methods are briefly described, the experiences and encountered difficulties are discussed, and some applications are shown.

    Keywords:

    gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis, sampling, organic air pollution, atmosphere, aerosol analysis, halogenated compounds, Tenax-GC, capillary column, organics, toxic organics


    Paper ID: STP27558S

    Committee/Subcommittee: D22.05

    DOI: 10.1520/STP27558S


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