STP707: A Critical Comparison of Two Bioconcentration Test Methods

    Bishop, WE
    Aquatic biologist and section head, Procter and Gamble Co., Ivorydale Technical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio

    Maki, AW
    Aquatic biologist and section head, Procter and Gamble Co., Ivorydale Technical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio

    Pages: 17    Published: Jan 1980


    Abstract

    The potential of a chemical to be bioconcentrated from the aqueous environment into fish tissues is generally determined by the kinetic or plateau method. The experiments reported here were designed to evaluate and compare these two methods directly. The test materials included ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), an anionic surfactant, a nonionic surfactant, and DDT. Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) whole-body equilibrium bioconcentration factors (BCF) based on 14C retention were calculated from short-term kinetic experiments and compared with BCF values measured in individual 28-day plateau tests. The bioconcentration factors ranged from essentially zero for EDTA, through very low for the surfactants, to very high for DDT. Over this range, BCF values calculated by the kinetic method compared favorably with those derived from the plateau tests. The bioconcentration potential of a wide variety of chemicals may be adequately described by either approach, the kinetic method having certain operational advantages.

    Keywords:

    aquatic toxicology, bioconcentration factor, uptake rate constant, clearance rate constant, water analysis, toxicology, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), surfactants, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), residue dynamics, kinetic model, bluegill, hazard evaluation


    Paper ID: STP27409S

    Committee/Subcommittee: E35.14

    DOI: 10.1520/STP27409S


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