STP627

    Preliminary Approaches to Experimental and Numerical Study on Fast Crack Propagation and Crack Arrest

    Published: Jan 1977


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    Abstract

    Within the limit of relatively short arrested crack, static approximation by applying linear fracture mechanics has yielded useful results for theoretical interpretation and practical application of currently used brittle fracture propagation arrest test (the concept of arrest toughness). But later experimental investigations using very wide specimens (1300 to 2500-mm-wide plates) have revealed that this simple interpretation fails to have a consistency with the case of a long arrested crack. For the inadequacy of static approximation based on arrest toughness concept, the concept of an effective stress intensity factor has been introduced from a practical point of view without a clear quantitative explanation for it. In search of a more relevant theory for fast crack propagation and to see how the neglect of dynamic aspects affects the interpretation of unstable crack propagation arrest test and philosophy of crack arrest design, a dynamic fracture mechanics analysis was made with the use of the finite-difference method to solve the equation of motion for the two-dimensional elastic problem.

    Results of a numerical experiment are presented, and experimental results for polymethylmethacrylate specimen and structural steels are discussed in terms of dynamic fracture mechanics analysis with a focus on energetic aspect of the crack propagation processes.

    Keywords:

    fracture properties, cracks, crack propagation, crack arrest, dynamic fracture mechanics, arrest toughness


    Author Information:

    Kanazawa, T
    Professor, associate professor, and graduate student, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo,

    Machida, S
    Professor, associate professor, and graduate student, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo,

    Teramoto, T
    Professor, associate professor, and graduate student, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo,


    Paper ID: STP27379S

    Committee/Subcommittee: E08.08

    DOI: 10.1520/STP27379S


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