STP495: Field Practices in the Repair of Fatigue Damaged Jet Engine Components

    Popp, HG
    Manager, material evaluation, and manager, metal process development, Material and Process Technology Laboratories, General Electric Company, Evendale, Ohio

    Wilbers, LG
    Manager, material evaluation, and manager, metal process development, Material and Process Technology Laboratories, General Electric Company, Evendale, Ohio

    Erdeman, VJ
    senior engineer, Power Plant Engineering, Eastern Airline Overhaul Shop, Miami, Fla.

    Pages: 26    Published: Jan 1971


    Abstract

    True rejuvenation of fatigue damaged material is not practiced in the aerospace power plant industry. Lack of knowledge on fatigue damage accumulation and lack of confidence in restoration processing have been the major barriers to its use. However, repair of fatigue damaged hardware is practiced widely in engine overhaul shops. Effectively, the three prime methods of: (1) removal of distressed metal, (2) replacement of the distressed area, or (3) repair welding can restore components to original condition. The unique ways in which these three methods are applied in jet engine overhaul are reviewed in sufficient detail to provide an appreciation of the techniques and provide information as to how they may be extended to other structures that sustain fatigue damage.

    Keywords:

    fatigue (materials), fatigue life, vibration, stress concentration, damage, jet engine, overhauling, reconditioning, renovating, maintenance, welding, evaluation, fatigue tests


    Paper ID: STP26687S

    Committee/Subcommittee: E08.05

    DOI: 10.1520/STP26687S


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