STP974: Retention of Physiological Marks by Coyotes Ingesting Baits Containing Iophenoxic Acid, Mirex, and Rhodamine B

    Knowlton, FF
    Wildlife biologist, Denver Wildlife Research Center, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Utah State University, Logan, Utah

    Savarie, PJ
    Pharmacologist and biological technician, Denver Wildlife Research Center, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Denver, CO

    Wahlgren, CE
    Graduate research assistant, Caesar Kleberg Wildlife Research Institute, Texas A&I University, Kingsville, TX

    Hayes, DJ
    Pharmacologist and biological technician, Denver Wildlife Research Center, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Denver, CO

    Pages: 7    Published: Jan 1988


    Abstract

    Pen-reared coyotes (Canis latrans) voluntarily ingested small tallow baits containing 10 or 15 mg of iophenoxic acid, 100-mg mirex, and 150-mg rhodamine B. One week after treatment with 10 and 15-mg iophenoxic acid, mean serum iodine was elevated from pretreatment levels of less than 5 µg/100 mL to 175 and 324 µg/100 mL, respectively. Serum iodine levels declined to about 25 µg/100 mL after four months, but were still fivefold higher than controls. Coyotes that ate baits containing 100-mg mirex averaged 0.34-ppm mirex in serum one week later levels declined to 0.15 ppm after four months. Serum samples obtained 2 and 24 h after death contained higher concentrations of iodine and mirex than samples obtained immediately before death. Although some back guard hairs of coyotes fed 150-mg rhodamine B showed distinct fluorescent bands, rhodamine B did not appear to provide a dependable mark because all guard hairs were not marked.

    Keywords:

    coyote, fluorescence, iodine, iophenoxic acid, mirex, physiological markers, rhodamine B


    Paper ID: STP26180S

    Committee/Subcommittee: E35.17

    DOI: 10.1520/STP26180S


    CrossRef ASTM International is a member of CrossRef.