STP1063: Corrosion of Reinforcing Steel and Wall Ties in Masonry Systems

    Haver, CA
    graduate in Metallurgical and Materials Engineeringemployedlecturer in chemistry and engineeringprofessor of chemistrycivil engineering professorhead of the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, California Polytechnic State UniversityCorrpro, Inc.California Polytechnic State University, San Luis ObispoPhiladelphia, CAPa

    Keeling, DL
    graduate in Metallurgical and Materials Engineeringemployedlecturer in chemistry and engineeringprofessor of chemistrycivil engineering professorhead of the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, California Polytechnic State UniversityCorrpro, Inc.California Polytechnic State University, San Luis ObispoPhiladelphia, CAPa

    Somayaji, S
    graduate in Metallurgical and Materials Engineeringemployedlecturer in chemistry and engineeringprofessor of chemistrycivil engineering professorhead of the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, California Polytechnic State UniversityCorrpro, Inc.California Polytechnic State University, San Luis ObispoPhiladelphia, CAPa

    Jones, D
    graduate in Metallurgical and Materials Engineeringemployedlecturer in chemistry and engineeringprofessor of chemistrycivil engineering professorhead of the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, California Polytechnic State UniversityCorrpro, Inc.California Polytechnic State University, San Luis ObispoPhiladelphia, CAPa

    Heidersbach, RH
    graduate in Metallurgical and Materials Engineeringemployedlecturer in chemistry and engineeringprofessor of chemistrycivil engineering professorhead of the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, California Polytechnic State UniversityCorrpro, Inc.California Polytechnic State University, San Luis ObispoPhiladelphia, CAPa

    Pages: 18    Published: Jan 1990


    Abstract

    The corrosion of metal associated with masonry systems is controversial. Little research has appeared on the subject, even though corrosion has been associated with multimillion dollar failures of masonry facades on buildings and other structures.

    This report reviews the available literature on corrosion in masonry and compares this literature with the more abundant literature on corrosion in concrete. Corrosion patterns and performance are discussed based on analyses of metal removed from a seawall in California and a building facade in Illinois.

    Keywords:

    corrosion, zinc, steel, mortar, chlorides, masonry, concrete, veneer walls, cavity walls, wall ties, metal reinforcement, carbonation


    Paper ID: STP24984S

    Committee/Subcommittee: C15.03

    DOI: 10.1520/STP24984S


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