STP1095

    The Effect of Heating on Engineering Properties of Clays

    Published: Jan 1990


      Format Pages Price  
    PDF Version (316K) 20 $25   ADD TO CART
    Complete Source PDF (3.8M) 20 $55   ADD TO CART


    Abstract

    The effect of heating on gradation, specific gravity, plasticity characteristics, swelling, and shear strength properties of a kaolin and a bentonite were investigated. The test soils were heated in an electric furnace to different temperatures up to 600°C. The engineering properties were determined by following ASTM standard procedures.

    Results of the study indicate that heating the kaolin to 400°C reduces the amount of swelling drastically. Further heating to 500°C causes a formation of larger particles, a drop of specific gravity, a change into nonplastic, and a substantial increase in shear strength of the kaolin. For the bentonite, larger particles are found when heated to 600°C. Also, at 600°C, the clay becomes nonplastic and nonexpansive and undergoes a moderate strength gain. Based on the results of the investigation, it is concluded that heating can be used to stabilize soft clay deposits effectively.

    Keywords:

    thermal stabilization, heating, clays, bentonite, kaolin, gradation, specific gravity, consistency limits, swelling, shear strength, expansive clays, soil stabilization


    Author Information:

    Wang, MC
    Professor of Civil Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

    Benway, JM
    Geotechnical engineer, Goldberg Zoino & Associates, Bridgeport, CT

    Arayssi, AM
    Geotechnical engineer, Solar Testing Laboratories, Inc., Cleveland, OH


    Paper ID: STP23553S

    Committee/Subcommittee: D18.15

    DOI: 10.1520/STP23553S


    CrossRef ASTM International is a member of CrossRef.