STP1143

    The Development of European Test Methods for the Measurement of Engine Oil Viscosities at Low Temperatures

    Published: Jan 1992


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    Abstract

    In response to the Society of Automotive Engineers' (SAE) desire to introduce cold-cranking viscosity limits measured at temperatures specified for each W-grade of engine oil, the Co-ordinating European Council (CEC) joined ASTM in 1982 in determining a precision statement for the so-called “Multi-Temperature CCS Method”. In 1990, CEC again collaborated with ASTM in a similar round-robin test which this time yielded a precision sufficiently encouraging for ASTM to ballot for Standard Test Method status. Two new techniques (differential scanning calorimetry and gas chromatography simulated distillation) differentiated between a limited population of good and poor industry pumpability reference oils. These techniques indicated that some model SAE 10W-30 oils blended from “critical” base oils could be potential pumpability problem oils despite acceptable borderline pumping viscosities in the Brookfield viscometric using the TP-1 cooldown cycle. The DSC and GC techniques are recommended as screening tests when developing new formulations. The development of a low-temperature oil pumpability test method employing the Brookfield viscometer in conjunction with the cooling cycle adopted in ASTM D4684-86 is described. Reference is made to a new, European-designed, high-precision viscometer for the measurement of low-temperature cranking viscosities.

    Keywords:

    Co-ordinating European Council (CEC), low-temperature viscosity, Cold-Cranking simulator, differential scanning calorimetry, GC-simulated distillation, Brookfield viscometer, Ravenfield CS viscometer


    Author Information:

    Vickars, MA
    Scientific AssociateChairmanSenior ChemistManagerPrincipal ScientistSenior Chemist, Esso Research CentreRohm and Haas Co, Petroleum Chemicals ResearchChemical Laboratory, Lubrizol International LabsShell Research LtdDeutsche Shell AG, PAE-Labor, AbingdonSpring HouseHazelwoodChesterHamburg, OxfordshirePADerby

    Huby, FJ
    Scientific AssociateChairmanSenior ChemistManagerPrincipal ScientistSenior Chemist, Esso Research CentreRohm and Haas Co, Petroleum Chemicals ResearchChemical Laboratory, Lubrizol International LabsShell Research LtdDeutsche Shell AG, PAE-Labor, AbingdonSpring HouseHazelwoodChesterHamburg, OxfordshirePADerby

    Jordan, CE
    Scientific AssociateChairmanSenior ChemistManagerPrincipal ScientistSenior Chemist, Esso Research CentreRohm and Haas Co, Petroleum Chemicals ResearchChemical Laboratory, Lubrizol International LabsShell Research LtdDeutsche Shell AG, PAE-Labor, AbingdonSpring HouseHazelwoodChesterHamburg, OxfordshirePADerby

    Bates, TW
    Scientific AssociateChairmanSenior ChemistManagerPrincipal ScientistSenior Chemist, Esso Research CentreRohm and Haas Co, Petroleum Chemicals ResearchChemical Laboratory, Lubrizol International LabsShell Research LtdDeutsche Shell AG, PAE-Labor, AbingdonSpring HouseHazelwoodChesterHamburg, OxfordshirePADerby

    Müller, HD
    Scientific AssociateChairmanSenior ChemistManagerPrincipal ScientistSenior Chemist, Esso Research CentreRohm and Haas Co, Petroleum Chemicals ResearchChemical Laboratory, Lubrizol International LabsShell Research LtdDeutsche Shell AG, PAE-Labor, AbingdonSpring HouseHazelwoodChesterHamburg, OxfordshirePADerby


    Paper ID: STP19597S

    Committee/Subcommittee: D02.07

    DOI: 10.1520/STP19597S


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