STP1105

    Tribological Models for Solid/Solid Contact: Missing Links

    Published: Jan 1991


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    Abstract

    This paper presents a brief overview of the tribological information which mechanical designers need, such as equations to predict frictional forces and wear rates. This is contrasted with the forms of result that typify wear testing in research, for example, comparative rates which are meaningful only for the apparatus used. And while the “systems nature” of tribology is well known by researchers, there is a natural tendency to overlook at least some complexities as attempts are made to isolate particular contact phenomena. Thus, both designers and researchers seek simplicity in problems which are inherently complex.

    This complexity is manageable, provided one is willing to deal with complete specification of the system. This paper addresses that issue, and suggests a representation for a tribosystem which incorporates features that require attention from both mechanical modelers and materials scientists. Specifically, there is a need for characterization of the dynamic behavior of tribosystems — including both specimen and counterface “sides,” of the apparatus — together with solution of the tribological problem set. That is, once time varying dynamic loads and motions are known, then the study of actual contact areas and force transmission to and through asperities can begin. Additionally, when the associated heat transfer problem is solved, it becomes possible to study the material response of specimen and counterface in terms of fundamental processes such as diffusion, adhesion, bond formation and rupture, and plastic strain accumulation in the substrate.

    A general tribosystem representation is suggested to underscore a sequence of mechanical problems which must be addressed in parallel with fundamental materials-related problems. Only when both sets are treated can the resulting systems' behavior be modeled from first principles. Thus, the new representation serves to highlight what is missing in tribological models for solid/solid contact.

    Keywords:

    tribological models, solid/solid contact, mechanical designers, tribosystem, dynamic behavior


    Author Information:

    Rice, SL
    Associate Dean and Director of ResearchAssociate Professor, College of EngineeringUniversity of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida

    Moslehy, FA
    Associate Dean and Director of ResearchAssociate Professor, College of EngineeringUniversity of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida


    Paper ID: STP17659S

    Committee/Subcommittee: G02.50

    DOI: 10.1520/STP17659S


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