STP1155

    A Comparison of Acceptability Scaling Methods for Use with Children

    Published: Jan 1992


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    Abstract

    Few studies concerning product testing by children have been published. Authors have previously suggested the use of verbal or facial scales to measure product acceptability with children. In a previous test comparing scales, one author concluded that a nine-point scale was marginally better than a seven-point scale. Verbal scales were slightly more discriminating for acceptability than the facial scale. In this study, the three-, five-, and nine-point lengths were tested as verbal, facial, and end-anchored box scales. Three different commercially available beverages were presented to the children. Results indicated that most scales could discriminate acceptability among the beverages. No one type or length of scale appeared to be more advantageous. Apparently, children do not use the facial scales or the short scales better than other scales and, therefore, do not need special scaling techniques.

    Keywords:

    consumer, children, scaling, acceptability


    Author Information:

    Spaeth, EE
    Graduate Student and Director, The Sensory Analysis Center, Department of Foods and Nutrition, Kansas State University,

    Chambers, E
    Graduate Student and Director, The Sensory Analysis Center, Department of Foods and Nutrition, Kansas State University,

    Schwenke, JR
    Assistant Professor, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas


    Paper ID: STP15878S

    Committee/Subcommittee: E18.06

    DOI: 10.1520/STP15878S


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