STP1287: Status of EPA's Bioresponse-Based Testing Program

    Tucker, WG
    National Risk Management Research Laboratory, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Hudnell, HK
    National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina

    Mason, MA
    National Risk Management Research Laboratory, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Pages: 10    Published: Jan 1996


    Abstract

    Research and development has been supported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) since 1990 to investigate the feasibility of using biological methods based on human, animal, or in vitro responses to characterize sources of indoor air emissions. The “bioresponse” methods being evaluated measure odor and sensory irritation of mucosal tissues in the eyes, nose, and upper airways. Chambers for creating controlled emissions from sources are basically the same as have been used for traditional studies of emission rates and chemical compositions. Studies of human subject responses to known odorous or sensory irritant chemicals using nose-only, eye-only, facial, and whole-body exposures are providing baseline data against which animal and in vitro results will be validated. The animal and in vitro methods being investigated measure changes in respiratory patterns and chemosensory evoked potentials. The status of current and future projects is reported.

    Keywords:

    indoor air, sources, source characterization, emissions testing, biological response methods, sensory irritation, health risks


    Paper ID: STP15630S

    Committee/Subcommittee: D22.01

    DOI: 10.1520/STP15630S


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