STP1287

    Biopollutant Sampling and Analysis of Indoor Surface Dusts: Characterization of Potential Sources and Sinks

    Published: Jan 1996


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    Abstract

    Biopollutant sinks (or reservoirs) are usually areas of surface contamination. As part of a larger study, a healthy building was characterized for one year for air and surface biopollution. Replicate samples for culturable fungi and bacteria were collected using impactors for bioaerosols, contact agar plates (CAP) for horizontal non-floor surfaces, and a high-volume small surface sampler (HVS3) for floor dusts from carpet and tile. Microbial characterization included assessing the occurrence of selected indicator fungi (Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus) and bacteria (Bacillus, gram-negatives, actinomycetes).

    Results showed correlation between: (1) airborne dust mass and airborne bacteria and fungi;(2) non-floor surface bacteria and fungi and airborne bacteria and fungi; (3) carpet dust mass and carpet dust fungi; and (4) carpet dust bacteria and airborne bacteria. Levels of bacteria and fungi in tile dust were similar to carpet dust levels.

    Biopollutant sampling of a healthy building for one year: (1) generated a significant, healthy building biopollutant characterization; (2) demonstrated relationships between airborne and surface dusts and biopollutants, for assessment of sinks and potential sources of biopollution; and (3) showed the need for continued research to define the role of cleaning (pollutant removal) in biopollutant sink and source management.

    Keywords:

    characterizing biopollutants, biopollutant sources and sinks, indoor surface dusts, indicator microorganisms, cleaning effectiveness


    Author Information:

    Cole, EC
    Associate director, DynCorp, Durham, NC

    Dulaney, PD
    Environmental biologist, research environmental scientist, environmental microbiologist, research environmental microbiologist, senior research environmental scientist, and environmental biologist, Center for Engineering and Environmental Technology, Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Leese, KE
    Environmental biologist, research environmental scientist, environmental microbiologist, research environmental microbiologist, senior research environmental scientist, and environmental biologist, Center for Engineering and Environmental Technology, Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Hall, RM
    Microbiologist, Dracor Water Systems, Dracor, Inc., Durham, NC

    Foarde, KK
    Environmental biologist, research environmental scientist, environmental microbiologist, research environmental microbiologist, senior research environmental scientist, and environmental biologist, Center for Engineering and Environmental Technology, Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Franke, DL
    Environmental biologist, research environmental scientist, environmental microbiologist, research environmental microbiologist, senior research environmental scientist, and environmental biologist, Center for Engineering and Environmental Technology, Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Myers, EM
    Environmental biologist, research environmental scientist, environmental microbiologist, research environmental microbiologist, senior research environmental scientist, and environmental biologist, Center for Engineering and Environmental Technology, Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Berry, MA
    Deputy director, Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC


    Paper ID: STP15619S

    Committee/Subcommittee: D22.05

    DOI: 10.1520/STP15619S


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