STP1386

    Trichlorethylene Vapor Adsorption by Nonwovens that Contain Activated Carbon

    Published: Jan 2000


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    Abstract

    The United States Army's chemical protective battle dress overgarment (BDO) acts as an insulator resulting in heat stress to personnel when worn in a desert climate. The purpose of the study was to develop and test an alternative vapor adsorption liner. The BDO liner consists of a polyurethane foam impregnated with 120 g/m2 activated carbon powder mixed in a slurry of latex with a 47.4 g/m2 (2 oz/yd2) nylon tricot knit flame bonded to one side. A 120 g/m2 activated carbon-nonwoven was developed and challenged with 1700 ppm trichloroethylene vapor. The activated carbon-nonwoven exhibited a higher vapor adsorption capacity to the Army's BDO liner but failed the Army's air permeability and bursting strength requirements. A continuous lightweight and thin membrane impervious to hazardous vapors but allowing perspiration vapor to penetration should be investigated as an alternative to the BDO liner.

    Keywords:

    trichloroethylene, CAS # 79-01-6, cotton, polypropylene, melt blow, spunbond, nonwoven, activated carbon, protective clothing, battle dress overgarment, BDO, military, chemical warfare


    Author Information:

    Dever, M
    Research associate professor and graduate student, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

    Tu, D
    Research associate professor and graduate student, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

    Davis, WT
    Professor, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN


    Paper ID: STP14455S

    Committee/Subcommittee: F23.93

    DOI: 10.1520/STP14455S


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