STP1237: Clothing Contamination Resulting from Greenhouse Spraying of Pesticides

    Obendorf, SK
    Professor, research associate, senior extension associate and graduate student, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

    Stone, JF
    Extension professor, Iowa State University, Ames, IA

    Derksen, RC
    Assistant professor, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

    Ravichandran, V
    Professor, research associate, senior extension associate and graduate student, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

    Coffman, CW
    Professor, research associate, senior extension associate and graduate student, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

    Koh, Y
    Professor, research associate, senior extension associate and graduate student, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

    Sanderson, JP
    Assistant professor, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

    Stahr, HM
    Professor of veterinary medicine, Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, Iowa State University, Ames, IA

    Pages: 12    Published: Jan 1996


    Abstract

    New spray technology involving charged droplets has been evaluated for improved treatment efficiencies. Our objectives were to further the investigation of contamination of non-targeted areas by measuring the pesticide deposition on applicator clothing during greenhouse spraying by Electrostatic Spraying System® (ESS) and DRAMM® sprayers, comparing deposition patterns and assessing the performance of Comfort-GardII® coveralls in a limited exposure situation. The deposition from the two sprayers was analyzed in two ways: visual analysis using a fluorescent dye tracer and chemical analysis of two insecticides, Orthene® and Tame®, using gas chromatography. The highest deposition observed with the fluorescent dye was on the gloves. The outer surfaces of the Comfort-Gard II coveralls were contaminated with both pesticides. Pesticide deposition was similar for the high concentration/low volume ESS sprayer and the low concentration/high volume DRAMM sprayer. Pesticide contamination at different locations on the coverall was highly variable with the back and chest of the torso having the highest concentrations. Under these test conditions with the higher concentration mix, pesticide was observed on the collection garment on the upper and lower arm with the Dramm sprayer and on the chest front for the ESS sprayer, thus we conclude that more lengthy and thorough investigations of Comfort-Gard II performance are needed.

    Keywords:

    Pesticides, greenhouse, protective equipment, worker exposure, clothing, sprayers, Comfort-Gard, ™, II, ®


    Paper ID: STP14071S

    Committee/Subcommittee: F23.93

    DOI: 10.1520/STP14071S


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