STP1321

    Hydrogen Induced Cracking Tests of High Strength Steels and Nickel-Iron Base Alloys Using the Bolt-Loaded Specimen

    Published: Jan 1997


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    Abstract

    Hydrogen induced cracking tests were conducted on high strength steels and nickel-iron base alloys using the constant displacement bolt-loaded compact specimen. The bolt-loaded specimen was subjected to both acid and electrochemical cell environments in order to produce hydrogen. The materials tested were A723, Maraging 200, PH 13-8 Mo, Alloy 718, Alloy 706, and A286, and ranged in yield strength from 760–1400 MPa. The effects of chemical composition, refinement, heat treatment, and strength on hydrogen induced crack growth rates and thresholds were examined. In general, all high strength steels tested exhibited similar crack growth rates and threshold levels. In comparison, the nickel-iron base alloys tested exhibited up to three orders of magnitude lower crack growth rates than the high strength steels tested. It is widely known that high strength steels and nickel base alloys exhibit different crack growth rates, in part, because of their different crystal cell structure. In the high strength steels tested, refinement and heat treatment had some effect on hydrogen induced cracking, though strength was the predominant factor influencing susceptibility to cracking. When the yield strength of one of the high strength steels tested was increased moderately, from 1130 MPa to 1275 MPa, the incubation times decreased by over two orders of magnitude, the crack growth rates increased by an order of magnitude, and the threshold stress intensity was slightly lower.

    Keywords:

    threshold stress intensity, hydrogen induced cracking, hydrogen cracking, hydrogen embrittlement, environmental fracture, environmental cracking, crack growth rates, high strength steels, nickel-iron base alloys


    Author Information:

    Vigilante, GN
    Mechanical Engineer, research engineer, mechanical engineer, metallurgist, mechanical engineering technician, and mechanical engineer, Army Armament RD&E Center, Benét Laboratories, Watervliet, NY

    Underwood, JH
    Mechanical Engineer, research engineer, mechanical engineer, metallurgist, mechanical engineering technician, and mechanical engineer, Army Armament RD&E Center, Benét Laboratories, Watervliet, NY

    Crayon, D
    Mechanical Engineer, research engineer, mechanical engineer, metallurgist, mechanical engineering technician, and mechanical engineer, Army Armament RD&E Center, Benét Laboratories, Watervliet, NY

    Tauscher, S
    Mechanical Engineer, research engineer, mechanical engineer, metallurgist, mechanical engineering technician, and mechanical engineer, Army Armament RD&E Center, Benét Laboratories, Watervliet, NY

    Sage, T
    Mechanical Engineer, research engineer, mechanical engineer, metallurgist, mechanical engineering technician, and mechanical engineer, Army Armament RD&E Center, Benét Laboratories, Watervliet, NY

    Troiano, E
    Mechanical Engineer, research engineer, mechanical engineer, metallurgist, mechanical engineering technician, and mechanical engineer, Army Armament RD&E Center, Benét Laboratories, Watervliet, NY


    Paper ID: STP12332S

    Committee/Subcommittee: E08.06

    DOI: 10.1520/STP12332S


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