STP1333

    The Use of Field Methods to Evaluate the Toxicity of Lead to Plants at a Small Arms Firing Range

    Published: Jan 1998


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    Abstract

    The beach dunes at Fort Ord, California, were historically used as small arms firing ranges, resulting in the accumulation of spent bullets and varying concentrations of lead in soil. The form of the lead, and thus its bioavailability, is important in assessing associated ecological risks at firing ranges. Of particular interest at the beach firing ranges at Fort Ord are two species of buckwheat plants that provide habitat for an endangered butterfly. Initially, lead concentrations in soil and plant chaff were measured and root elongation bioassays were conducted. A linear correlation between lead in soil and lead in plant chaff was observed. However, the results of the bioassays were highly variable with no clear dose response pattern. Additional field studies were conducted to (1) further characterize lead concentrations in soil and plant tissue and (2) evaluate associations between soil lead concentrations and plant morpnometric-variables. A relationship between soil and tissue lead concentrations was demonstrated. No significant associations between soil lead levels and plant health/condition were detected. Significant associations were observed between plant health/condition and factors other than lead.

    Keywords:

    lead, firing ranges, plant uptake, morphometrics, bioavailability, Smith's blue butterfly, buckwheat


    Author Information:

    DeShields, BR
    Project manager, senior scientist, staff scientist, and principal scientist, Harding Lawson Associates, Novato, CA

    Environmental scientist, U.S. Army, Directorate of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, Presidio of Monterey, CA

    Meredith, RW
    Project manager, senior scientist, staff scientist, and principal scientist, Harding Lawson Associates, Novato, CA

    Environmental scientist, U.S. Army, Directorate of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, Presidio of Monterey, CA

    Griffin, D
    Project manager, senior scientist, staff scientist, and principal scientist, Harding Lawson Associates, Novato, CA

    Environmental scientist, U.S. Army, Directorate of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, Presidio of Monterey, CA

    Laughlin, T
    Project manager, senior scientist, staff scientist, and principal scientist, Harding Lawson Associates, Novato, CA

    Environmental scientist, U.S. Army, Directorate of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, Presidio of Monterey, CA

    Collins, W
    Project manager, senior scientist, staff scientist, and principal scientist, Harding Lawson Associates, Novato, CA

    Environmental scientist, U.S. Army, Directorate of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, Presidio of Monterey, CA


    Paper ID: STP12162S

    Committee/Subcommittee: E47.11

    DOI: 10.1520/STP12162S


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