STP1425: Development of Test Methods for High Temperature Fretting of Turbine Materials Subjected to Engine-Type Loading

    Murthy, H
    Graduate Student, School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

    Rajeev, PT
    Graduate Student, School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

    Okane, M
    Toyama University,

    Farris, TN
    Professor and Head, School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

    Pages: 16    Published: Jan 2003


    Abstract

    Two bodies are said to be in fretting contact when they are clamped together under the action of a normal force and see an oscillatory motion of small amplitudes at the contact interface due to the effect of shear force and bulk stress. The contact stresses that drive crack nucleation are very sensitive to the shape of the contacting surfaces and the coefficient of friction. To have an understanding of fretting at the contacts in turbine engine components, it is important to simulate similar temperature, load, and contact conditions in the laboratory and develop tools to analyze the contact conditions. Efforts made to simulate the temperature and load conditions typical of engine hardware in a controlled laboratory setting, similar to that developed previously at room temperature, are described. It is shown that the temperature in the contact region can be held constant at nominally 600°C. Preliminary results are given in terms of loads and measured total lives along with thoughts on development of a total life model for single crystal materials.

    Keywords:

    high temperature, fretting, fatigue, life prediction, turbo-machinery, friction, Ti-6Al-4V, single crystal nickel


    Paper ID: STP10765S

    Committee/Subcommittee: E08.03

    DOI: 10.1520/STP10765S


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